genetic modification

Opponents of genetically engineered crops in Oregon want state lawmakers to allow local governments to ban those crops. The measure under consideration would reverse a bill approved during a special session less than three years ago.

The latest vote tallies from Washington confirm voters have rejected an initiative to require labels for food containing genetically modified organisms.

Results of a ballot measure in Tuesday’s election in Washington to require labeling of food containing genetically modified ingredients will reverberate throughout the nation’s food industry.

Washington voters decide Tuesday whether food containing genetically modified organisms should be labeled. Activists in Oregon are planning their own initiative.

Voters are about to decide whether Washington becomes the first state in the nation to label some genetically engineered foods.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

The state of Washington grows about 300 types of crops -- from the lush valleys north of Seattle, to the orchards of the Columbia Basin, to the rolling fields between Spokane and Walla Walla. And ask any of those farmers about Washington’s Initiative 522 and you’ll get every kind of answer. If passed this November, it would require labeling of genetically modified foods. The initiative would not ban GMOs, as they’re known. But it could have a big impact on Washington agriculture. Correspondent Anna King visited two family farms to get two very different perspectives.

Report Analyzes GMO Labeling Impacts

Oct 9, 2013
Stan Dalone / Flickr

Washington lawmakers wanted to know more about genetically modified foods and their impact. So they turned to the Washington State Academy of Science for some answers.

It’s the hottest issue on Washington’s fall ballot: an initiative to require labeling of genetically engineered foods. But Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, a Democrat, says he hasn’t decided how he’ll vote on Initiative 522.

Agribusiness and the food industry have pumped a record $17 million into Washington state so far to defeat Initiative 522.

Oregon GMO Activists Look To Fight State Control

Oct 3, 2013
Edmund Garman / Flickr

Oregon lawmakers put the brakes on anti-GMO initiatives in four counties when they passed Senate Bill 863 this week. The bill prohibits local governments from banning genetically modified crops.

Opponents of genetic labels on food just got a $5 million boost. The donation from the Grocery Manufacturers Association sends the No On 522 campaign into the record books. More money is going against the genetic labeling initiative than against any other ballot measure in Washington history.

Critics of genetically modified foods are lobbying hard to get the issue off the agenda in next week’s special legislative session in Salem.

Tests of alfalfa seed from a field in eastern Washington have come back positive for genetically engineered genes called Round-Up-Ready.

Washington agriculture researchers are investigating whether genetically engineered alfalfa was growing where it wasn’t supposed to in the eastern part of the state.

John Ryan

Backers of a Washington state ballot initiative to require labels on genetically modified foods have raised four times more cash than their opponents. Both sides’ contributions have mostly come from outside Washington state.

Who's Ready For Biotech Wheat?

Jul 1, 2013
Grant Gerlock

Most of the corn and soybeans grown in the U.S. are genetically modified. But not wheat. That’s why it was so surprising when Roundup-resistant wheat was discovered in an Oregon field last month. The finding triggered an outcry from food safety advocates and an ongoing investigation by the government. As Grant Gerlock of Harvest Public Media reports, many farmers say they would like biotechnology in wheat to help feed a hungry world, but it’s not what everyone’s hungry for.

The US Department of Agriculture says stalks of genetically modified wheat found in a field in Oregon look to be an isolated incident. In an announcement Friday the agency says its own tests confirm the suspect wheat carries modified genes designed by agribusiness giant Monsanto.

Northwest farmers appear relieved that the government is calling the discovery of genetically modified wheat “a single isolated incident in a single field on a single farm.”

Federal inspectors have taken seed samples from a distributor in Walla Walla, Wash., as part of their investigation to find out how genetically modified wheat wound up in an Oregon field. That’s according to a news report published by the Capital Press.

Matt Lavin / Wikimedia Commons

After unauthorized, genetically modified wheat was found in an Oregon field, scientists have been trying to figure out what that means for wheat crops. Beyond farmers’ fields, a few pesky plants could also benefit as more genetically modified crops come into play.

Anna King

There’s been a lot of speculation but few answers so far about how genetically modified wheat ended up in an Oregon field.

Gary Halvorson / Wikimedia Commons

The European Union and Korea have said they will test U.S. shipments of wheat for genetic modification. That’s after last week's report that an unapproved strain of genetically modified wheat developed by Monsanto was found on an Oregon farm.

Werewombat / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed today that an Oregon field is contaminated with a genetically modified strain of wheat.


Washington Senate Panel Hears Debate On GMO Labeling

Feb 22, 2013

A Washington State Senate Committee heard testimony last week regarding the state initiative that calls for labeling genetically modified foods. Steve Jackson has more.

Southern Oregon County Will Consider GMO Ban In 2014

Jan 11, 2013

In November, voters in San Juan county Washington banned genetically modified crops. Now Southern Oregon’s Rogue Valley could follow suit. A proposed GMO ban just qualified for the 2014 Jackson County ballot. Amelia Templeton of EarthFix reports.

Supporters of a legislative initiative that would require companies to label products containing genetically-modified foods have turned in their signatures to the Secretary of State’s office in Olympia. The grassroots campaign says it has about 100,000 more than required for certification.