Gambling

Idaho Governor Butch Otter has vetoed a repeal of so-called “instant horse racing” and has asked Idaho lawmakers to come up with a different strategy for dealing with the gambling machines in the state.

A bill that would repeal so-called “instant horse racing” in Idaho is headed to the governor’s desk.

Several hundred gambling devices in Idaho would become illegal under a bill now headed to the House floor.

The Idaho Senate Tuesday passed a bill that would repeal a law allowing so-called “instant horse-racing” gambling machines. One senator said the Legislature had been the victim of a “bait and switch.”

A panel in the Idaho Senate has voted to undo the 2013 decision that allowed so-called “instant horse racing” machines. Now the bill goes before the full Senate.

The manufacturer of so-called “instant horse racing” machines tried to convince Idaho lawmakers Monday not ban the gambling devices.

Shawn Gust / Associated Press

The popular Julyamsh Powwow, the largest such event in the Northwest, has been canceled this year in northern Idaho.

The Julyamsh event was to be held at the Greyhound Park in Post Falls, where it’s taken place for the last 17 years. But last month the tribe sent a letter to Idaho lawmakers, critical of instant horse racing gaming machines that are being allowed at several sites in the state, including at the Greyhound Park.

Tribal spokeswoman Heather Keen said the cancellation centers on that dispute.

On the eve of the Super Bowl, Washington state lawmakers are considering whether to legalize fantasy sports contests.

Poker is a favorite metaphor for life, and Colson Whitehead says it's not a bad comparison — especially for big city life. "I think you survive in New York just by having fewer bad things happen to you," he tells NPR's Scott Simon. "And I think that's true for poker as well: If you can play your good cards your bad cards decently and hope that your other player is not as adept at riding these currents of luck and circumstance, you're in good shape."

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

  The Oregon Lottery spends millions of dollars a year to prevent gambling addiction. But some Oregon lawmakers say that effort has been ineffective. Now, a legislative committee may force the Lottery to hire someone to coordinate its anti-addiction efforts.

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