Fishing

Duwamish River Pollution
6:05 am
Thu July 19, 2012

Clean Water: The Next Act - Seattle's Duwamish River Part II

The upper part of the Duwamish River, seen from 119th Street in Tukwila, Wash.
Photo by Joe Mabel Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

This fall marks the 40th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act – a piece of legislation that changed the way waterbodies in this country are regulated and protected.

Pollution was supposed to be curtailed so that fish from all the waters in America would be safe for people to eat. 40 years later, though, many waterways still bear fish too tainted to consume safely.

One of the most polluted waterways in the Northwest is Seattle’s Duwamish River. We’re taking a look at the Duwamish as part of EarthFix’s series “Clean Water: The Next Act.”

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Gillnet Fishing
6:14 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Campaign Says Gillnet Ban Heading To Oregon Ballot

Oregon voters likely will decide this fall whether to ban gillnet fishing in the Columbia River and other state waters. Campaigners say they turned in enough signatures
Monday to qualify their gillnet ban as a ballot measure in the November election. Oregon requires more than 87,000 valid signatures on petitions for initiatives that change state law.

Eric Stachon is spokesman for the Stop Gillnets Now Coalition. He says the group turned in more than 138-thousand signatures to the Oregon Secretary of State.

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Oregon Marine Reserves
3:58 pm
Mon June 18, 2012

Oregon Releases Fishing Rules For New Marine Reserves

Cape Perpetua, the home of one of the new marine reserves approved by the Oregon State Legislature.
Gene Daniels Wikimedia Commons

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has released rules for three new marine reserves on the Oregon Coast. The state Legislature approved the reserves at Cape Perpetua, Cascade Head, and Cape Falcon. The reserves will protect species like rockfish, shrimp, and sardines that live near the shore.

A total fishing ban would apply in the core areas of the reserves. In other protected areas, the new rules would allow some salmon fishing and crabbing.

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Bristol Bay Mining
7:10 am
Thu May 31, 2012

Report Details Risks of Proposed Mine Near Alaska's Bristol Bay

Bristol Bay, in Southwestern Alaska, is the home of one of the world’s largest runs of Sockeye salmon. In fact, all five types of salmon spawn in the bay’s freshwater tributaries.

Bristol Bay could also become the home of a new mine to extract copper, gold and other minerals.

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a risk assessment study on how mining could impact the ecosystem there. The Agency will hold a public hearing in Seattle Thursday.

Ashley Ahearn reports that fishermen in the Northwest are watching the process closely.

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Salmon Virus
7:00 am
Wed May 30, 2012

Deadly Virus Makes First Appearance in Washington Salmon Farm

A deadly virus that prompted salmon farmers in British Columbia to kill 560,000 fish has shown up for the first time in Washington. Ashley Ahearn reports.

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Tribal Fishing
6:32 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Ceremonial Fisheries Culturally Important to NW Tribes

Chinook salmon swimming upstream
Photo by: Dan Cook U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

DALLESPORT, Wash. – Columbia River Indian tribes are keeping their ancient traditions alive in the coming weeks with ceremonies to open their spring fisheries. As Courtney Flatt explains, predictions of strong salmon runs are giving the tribes extra reason to celebrate.

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Non-Native Fish
7:43 am
Tue February 21, 2012

Slowing the Northern Pike Population Expansion

Large northern pike captured in Box Canyon Reservoir in 2008.
Photo source: Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

Non-nativSPOKANE VALLEY, Wash. – The northern pike population has exploded in eastern Washington’s Box Canyon Reservoir. These non-native fish have gone from a few hundred to around 10-thousand over the past five years. As correspondent Courtney Flatt reports, the increasing numbers can damage native fish populations, like salmon and steelhead.

Throw your line out in Box Canyon Reservoir, and you’ll likely find a northern pike on the other end. Over the past several years, the northern pike population has increased so rapidly that it’s hard to catch anything else.

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