fire

Two fires in Central Washington state near the resort town of Wenatchee have merged together. Firefighters are struggling to get the blaze contained.

Photo by Anna King / Northwest News Network

This week fire crews declared the Taylor Bridge fire 100-percent contained. Now that the massive blaze in central Washington is controlled forest scientists say Northwest residents should brace for more large fires like this. Munching insects, parasitic plants and global climate change are part of the problem. Correspondent Anna King reports from the field with one of Washington’s top forest managers.

U.S. Forest Service

Two hunters who were reported missing during a wildfire in eastern Oregon have been located and are safe. But Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer says there's new concern about a pair of hikers who are thought to be in the vicinity of the Parish Cabin Fire.

Photo by Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

A damaging wildfire in central Washington has been declared 100 percent contained, this more than two weeks after it ignited. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.

Boise National Forest

A cold front moving through the Northwest is expected to do more harm than good for fire crews battling massive blazes in southern Idaho. Forecasters predict very low humidity on top of winds that could reach 30 miles per hour.

Fire bosses say a blaze in central Washington is 90 percent contained. That’s while large fires continue to burn in Idaho and California. Getting these wildfires under control marks the beginning of a new problem: soil erosion.

Extreme heat from wildfires destroys trees and ground cover. That means plants no longer keep soil from sliding down hillsides and into streams.

Residents near the Taylor Bridge Wildfire could see more sediment on roads and in creeks. They also might notice wind kicking up extra dust.

Photo courtesy Wash. Department of Ecology

Firefighters are getting a better handle on the Taylor Bridge fire burning in central Washington State. Fire crews say they have the fire 90 percent contained. So far the blaze has destroyed more than 50 homes and displaced many residents and livestock. Correspondent Anna King reports.

Zane Brown / inciweb.org

Fire crews in southern Idaho are now at a standoff with a fire that’s surrounded the resort town of Featherville. It’s been clear for days that the town’s businesses and summer homes are in the path of the 90,000 acre Trinity Ridge Fire east of Boise. But fire managers say they have to wait for the blaze to creep to lower ground before crews can fight it head-on.

Trinity Ridge Fire Gets Closer To Featherville

Aug 21, 2012

More than a thousand fire fighters in Idaho are working to protect homes as a massive wildfire moves closer to the mountain communities of Pine and Featherville. Sadie Babits reports.

The Trinity Ridge fire burning 100 miles northeast of Boise remains the state’s number one firefighting priority. That’s because the wildfire continues to threaten hundreds of homes in Pine and Featherville. Mary Christensen – a fire information officer – says thick smoke lifted and now the wildfire has picked up.

Photo courtesy Veseth family via U.S. Forest Service

Managers at a blaze in north Idaho were warned about hazardous conditions the day before a 20-year-old firefighter died on the job. That’s according to an informal report by the head of a federal hotshot crew, which refused to work on the fire. Correspondent Jessica Robinson has more.

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