fire

Two fires in Central Washington state near the resort town of Wenatchee have merged together. Firefighters are struggling to get the blaze contained.

Photo by Anna King / Northwest News Network

This week fire crews declared the Taylor Bridge fire 100-percent contained. Now that the massive blaze in central Washington is controlled forest scientists say Northwest residents should brace for more large fires like this. Munching insects, parasitic plants and global climate change are part of the problem. Correspondent Anna King reports from the field with one of Washington’s top forest managers.

U.S. Forest Service

Two hunters who were reported missing during a wildfire in eastern Oregon have been located and are safe. But Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer says there's new concern about a pair of hikers who are thought to be in the vicinity of the Parish Cabin Fire.

Photo by Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

A damaging wildfire in central Washington has been declared 100 percent contained, this more than two weeks after it ignited. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.

Fire Keeps Idahoans From Favorite Summer Getaway Spot

Aug 24, 2012
Boise National Forest

A cold front moving through the Northwest is expected to do more harm than good for fire crews battling massive blazes in southern Idaho. Forecasters predict very low humidity on top of winds that could reach 30 miles per hour.

Fire bosses say a blaze in central Washington is 90 percent contained. That’s while large fires continue to burn in Idaho and California. Getting these wildfires under control marks the beginning of a new problem: soil erosion.

Extreme heat from wildfires destroys trees and ground cover. That means plants no longer keep soil from sliding down hillsides and into streams.

Residents near the Taylor Bridge Wildfire could see more sediment on roads and in creeks. They also might notice wind kicking up extra dust.

Photo courtesy Wash. Department of Ecology

Firefighters are getting a better handle on the Taylor Bridge fire burning in central Washington State. Fire crews say they have the fire 90 percent contained. So far the blaze has destroyed more than 50 homes and displaced many residents and livestock. Correspondent Anna King reports.

Crews Prepare As Fire Creeps Toward Idaho Town

Aug 21, 2012
Zane Brown / inciweb.org

Fire crews in southern Idaho are now at a standoff with a fire that’s surrounded the resort town of Featherville. It’s been clear for days that the town’s businesses and summer homes are in the path of the 90,000 acre Trinity Ridge Fire east of Boise. But fire managers say they have to wait for the blaze to creep to lower ground before crews can fight it head-on.

Trinity Ridge Fire Gets Closer To Featherville

Aug 21, 2012

More than a thousand fire fighters in Idaho are working to protect homes as a massive wildfire moves closer to the mountain communities of Pine and Featherville. Sadie Babits reports.

The Trinity Ridge fire burning 100 miles northeast of Boise remains the state’s number one firefighting priority. That’s because the wildfire continues to threaten hundreds of homes in Pine and Featherville. Mary Christensen – a fire information officer – says thick smoke lifted and now the wildfire has picked up.

Photo courtesy Veseth family via U.S. Forest Service

Managers at a blaze in north Idaho were warned about hazardous conditions the day before a 20-year-old firefighter died on the job. That’s according to an informal report by the head of a federal hotshot crew, which refused to work on the fire. Correspondent Jessica Robinson has more.

Idaho Fire Continues To Threaten Mountain Towns

Aug 20, 2012

Wildfires have burned more land this year in the U.S. than in the last decade. Large fires continue to burn in California, Washington, Nevada and Idaho.

Firefighters have mostly contained the Holloway fire, a massive blaze on the Oregon-Nevada border. But Amelia Templeton of Earthfix reports there is still no clear solution for the cattle left homeless by Oregon’s summer fires.

Photo courtesy Wash. Deptartment of Natural Resources

Fire bosses at the scene of a destructive wildfire in central Washington gave an upbeat progress report at a community briefing in Cle Elum Friday. Firefighters targeted full containment of the nearly 23,000 acre blaze by Sunday. Reporter Courtney Flatt is on the scene. She says the mood at the community briefing was more curious than anything else.

Photo courtesy Wash. Department of Natural Resources

A large wildfire in the remote mountains of Central Washington state has burned 22 thousand acres . The Northwest News Network’s Anna King reports the fire has destroyed at least 60 structures from Cle Elum.

Nearly 800 firefighters have been battling the wind-whipped fire for several days. 18-year-old Tyler Oversby stared as giant plumes of smoke crept closer to his hometown.

Photo by Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Firefighters on the scene of a destructive wildfire in central Washington are hoping to make major progress Wednesday toward containment of the blaze. The Kittitas County sheriff's office estimates more than 70 homes and cabins have been destroyed. The fire has chased hundreds of people from their homes. Amidst the ashes, correspondent Tom Banse found one unusual story of survival.

Animals Rescued From Taylor Bridge Fire

Aug 14, 2012
kallerna / Wikimedia Commons

As the Taylor Bridge Fire continues to be battled from the air, people are looking for a safe place to put their cows, horses, llamas and other livestock. The fairgrounds in Ellensburg are holding at least 150 large animals.

Firefighting Still Dangerous, But For Different Reasons

Aug 14, 2012
Photo courtesy Veseth family via U.S. Forest Service

The U.S. Forest Service has identified a firefighter killed in Idaho on Sunday as 20-year-old Anne Veseth, of Moscow, Idaho. She was struck by a falling tree at the Steep Corner Fire southeast of Coeur d’Alene. As Jessica Robinson reports, firefighting deaths fluctuate from year to year, but the biggest source of that danger has shifted.

Photo by Amelia Templeton

Officials say the massive Long Draw fire in South East Oregon stopped actively burning over the weekend. The fire consumed more than 900 square miles of rangeland. Amelia Templeton reports, ranchers are searching for their cows.

Longdraw Fire Grows Tenfold Since Tuesday

Jul 11, 2012

Fire officials are reporting that a wildfire burning in the southeast corner of Oregon has grown to nearly 300,000 acres. That's about 10 times larger than it was Tuesday. Crews had built fire lines on three sides, only to have that work undone with a burst of erratic winds. Temperatures in the area have hovered around 100 degrees and are expected to continue through the rest of the week.

Firefighters Are Hard At Work In Eastern Oregon

Jul 10, 2012

In Eastern Oregon Tuesday, fire engines, hand crews and materials continued to pour in from across the region, as fire managers worked to contain a number of blazes sparked by recent lightning storms.

Western US Faces Air Tanker Shortage

Jul 6, 2012

As wildfires continue to burn in the West, the U-S Forest Service is going to battle this summer with fewer air tankers. The number of planes that drop retardant on fires has shrunk significantly over the last 12 years. From Boise, Scott Graf has more now on what led to the shortage, and what’s being done to fix it.

Despite wildfires burning hundreds of homes in the last few weeks, the Cabinet member who oversees the U.S. Forest Service said [yesterday] Tuesday there have been fewer fires this year compared to this time last year. Tom Vilsack made the comments during a stop in Idaho. From Boise, Scott Graf has more.

Photo courtesy Washington Department of Natural Resources

Some firefighters from the Northwest have been sent to blazes across the West. But the firefighters still at home are playing the waiting game.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano visited Boise Tuesday. They toured the center that coordinates national wildfire response efforts.

Some firefighters from the Northwest have been sent to blazes across the West. But as Jessica Robinson reports, the firefighters still at home are playing the waiting game.

Washington’s Lands Commissioner is expected to declare the state’s first ever forest health hazard warning Monday. The formal declaration comes amid growing concern about the potential for a catastrophic fire – not unlike what we’ve seen in recent days in Colorado. Olympia Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.

Photo by Virginia Alvino / Northwest News Network

One small-town movie theater is looking for a happy ending to what could have been a horror story earlier this year. The historic Palace Theatre in Silverton, Oregon closed its doors after an April fire. But repairs are underway at the Depression-era movie palace. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.

Cody Crawford, the man charged in the firebombing of a Corvallis, Oregon mosque in 2010, will be released from jail Wednesday morning. Judge Thomas Coffin made the ruling after two court sessions Tuesday. KLCC’S Lucy Ohlsen was at the Federal Courthouse in Eugene.

Photo credit: David Johnson / Wikimedia Commons

Agriculture officials say fire season looks mild this year for Washington and Idaho, but that doesn’t mean they’re taking a backseat on preparedness.

Feds’ Best Guess: Mild Fire Season For Much Of Northwest

Apr 26, 2012
Photo courtesy of www.inciweb.org

Some hard-to-read global weather patterns are making this year’s fire season difficult to forecast. That’s according to experts at federal agencies that track wildfires. But as best they can tell, the Northwest is in for a milder season than other fire-prone parts of the country.

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