Film

ALL CLASSICAL PUBLIC MEDIA

A classically trained Shakespearean actor and the BBC’s former Hollywood correspondent,  Edmund Stone is host of one a new program on the NPR and Classical music service. The Score is a weekly celebration of music in film.  

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Film and television producers will soon have an even greater incentive to shoot in Oregon. Starting Monday, the Oregon Department of Revenue will auction off tax credits to replenish a subsidy fund to lure major Hollywood productions to the state.

Picture Rick's smoky cafe in Casablanca, Lincoln's office at the White House of the 1860s, or the Mos Eisley cantina on the desert planet of Tatooine: A production designer came up with the overall look of those movie sets. But the booze on Rick's bar or the pens on Lincoln's desk — it took a set decorator and a crew to make them look authentic and believable.

Photo by Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

A 130-year-old mental institution might seem like an odd place for a museum. But historians and mental health advocates have fought to preserve and tell the Oregon State Hospital's long and sordid history.

Photo by Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

This summer’s blockbuster line-up is teeming with highly anticipated names -- like Batman, Spiderman, and the Avengers. That’s good news for the people who run cinemas. But for many small theaters across the Northwest, opening weekend is becoming a struggle.

More movies are starting to come on hard drives instead of reels. So theaters must make a costly conversion to digital if they want to stay in the game. And, as Jessica Robinson reports, time is running out.

In the old days, movies — even the big epics — were shot on studio back lots. Tara, that iconic Gone With the Wind plantation, was made of plywood and papier maché.

These days, movie locations are mostly real, though. And they're found by location scouts, who are often the first people hired for a film.

Should be easy work, right? You drive around town, spot a house you think could work for a film, drive back home? Not quite.

Before they made it to the Oscars, the nominated films — not to mention all the films that didn't make the cut — were viewed by some 6,000 members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Many of those movies were shown in small, private, rented screening rooms all over Hollywood.

The studios have their own screening rooms, of course, but often directors want a more private place to screen works in progress — with no studio suits in sight.

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Imagine that one of your earliest childhood memories is of blood, screaming, and chainsaws. That’s the case for commentator Corinna Nicolaou as she remembers a massacre!

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog