family

Add Marcos Giralt Torrente's Father and Son: A Lifetime to the shortlist of worthwhile memoirs about mourning a parent — a list that includes Philip Roth's Patrimony, Paul Auster's The Invention of Solitude, and Hanif Kureishi's My Ear at His Heart, all of which the author cites as touchstones for his exploration.

Some things in life are just too painful to accept, and the same is true in novels. Family Life is the story of the Mishras, who immigrate to the U.S. in the late 1970s from India. Their departure is such a big deal that townspeople gather around just to have a look at their airplane tickets. Expectations of the life that awaits them start to build. "Americans clean themselves with paper, not water," says a classmate of the younger Mishra brother, Ajay, who narrates the novel. "In America, they say 'yeah' not yes," the boy goes on. To which Ajay replies, "That's nothing.

MABTON, Wash. - Most American families have some kind of immigration lore -- think Ellis Island, the Oregon Trail and slave ships. At dinner tables across the Northwest, some Mexican-American families tell their own vivid tales. They regale each other with stories of relatives swimming to better opportunities across the Rio Grande or crossing the desert at night.

Yes, these crossings are illegal, but they also are part of a family’s history. If the U.S. Congress adopts comprehensive immigration reform this year, these types of border stories could begin to fade.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Paid medical leave benefits would expand for employees under a measure in the Washington legislature. The measure would allow workers to take up to 12 weeks to tend to new babies in addition to 12 weeks for other medical issues at home.

Proponents of increasing paid time-off for families filled a hearing room in Olympia Tuesday. Don Orange owns a small auto repair shop in Vancouver, Wash. He testified he would gladly pay extra for the new benefit.

StoryCorps Northwest

Life in Seward, Alaska wasn't easy for English major Amy Buckler and her husband. They had a tough time making ends meet. One day, they decided to leave and start a new life in Oregon with their young daughter. In today's StoryCorps Amy tells her now 10-year-old daughter, Mina Black, about a trip that would prove tougher than they'd ever expected.