Environmental Protection Agency

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Images

President Trump’s move to undo President Obama’s Clean Power Plan could make it easier for power plants to keep burning coal. But the Northwest’s biggest coal user still plans to cut back on the dirtiest fuel.

Oregon DEQ Prepares For Big Staff Cuts Under Trump

Mar 22, 2017
Rob Manning / OPB

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality expects to lose more than 30 people in the agency’s core programs protecting air and water quality because of President Trump’s proposed cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency budget, according to an internal DEQ memo.

Washington state Sen. Doug Ericksen was paid $11,438 for his first four weeks working for the Trump administration’s Environmental Protection Agency, with a listed annual salary of $161,900, according to documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act.

STATE OF OKLAHOMA

Former Washington state Sen. Don Benton said he’s “very excited” about the confirmation of Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency. Benton is a senior adviser to the White House at the EPA.

White House advisor and former Washington state Sen. Don Benton is part of the team implementing the president’s agenda at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Benton was sworn in as senior advisor Saturday, he said. The job is a temporary position, but could be extended. During the campaign, Benton served as Trump’s campaign chairman in Washington.

A conservative Republican state senator from northeast Washington has resigned his seat to take a job with the new Trump administration. Sen. Brian Dansel announced his resignation Tuesday leaving the Washington Senate in a temporary political tie.

EPA Calls For $1 Billion Portland Harbor Superfund Cleanup

Jan 6, 2017
Bonnie Stewart / OPB

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released a final plan for cleaning up pollution at the Portland Harbor Superfund Site. 

Leaders with the city of Portland say the $746 million plan to clean up the Portland Harbor Superfund Site isn't perfect, but it's good enough to move forward.

Elaine Thompson / / AP Photo

Facing pressure from federal regulators, Governor Jay Inslee has directed state officials to take another stab at updating clean water rules, tied partly to how much fish people eat. Washington’s current standards are out of compliance with the federal Clean Water Act. So last month the Environmental Protection Agency put forward draft rules that will become final in less than a year, unless the state comes up with their own.

Obama Administration Finalizes Clean Water Rule

May 27, 2015
U.S. Department of Agriculture

The Obama Administration announced a new clean water rule Wednesday. The Environmental Protection Agency says it will help limit pollution in streams and wetlands.

The rule is meant to clarify uncertainty about who can regulate these smaller waterways and water bodies.

Environmentalists say the new rule will keep drinking water clean. Lauren Goldberg is the staff attorney with Columbia Riverkeeper. She says this new rule will provide critical protection for clean drinking water and fish habitat.

Photo by Chris Lehman. / Northwest News Network

And now a story about farmers and water. It’s a common and often contentious issue out here in the West. Well now farmers across the country are also riled up. That’s because the U.S. EPA wants to revise the clean water act. As Correspondent Chris Lehman explains depending on who you talk to these revisions are either a “land grab” under the “brute force” of the federal government or a simple clarification of rules that ensure all Americans have clean water to drink.