Environment and Planning

Leaders with the city of Portland say the $746 million plan to clean up the Portland Harbor Superfund Site isn't perfect, but it's good enough to move forward.

Berkeley Lab / Google Images

Researchers from Portland State University are in Eugene today to find the city’s hot spots. Their study of urban “heat islands” can help planners to improve conditions during heat waves like the one we’re experiencing.

PSU urban studies and environmental science professor Dr. Vivek Shandas says heat-waves kill more people than all other natural disasters combined. Shandas and his team have done a similar study of heat islands in Portland. He’s observed abundant tree canopy and farmland in Eugene’s urban core. He knows trees can provide cooler temps.

Jeff Barnard/AP

Building in flood zones is about to get harder across much of Oregon, due to new federal recommendations.

The administration of Washington Governor Jay Inslee is moving ahead with a plan to limit greenhouse gas pollution from the state's largest industrial sources.

Cleaning up the central part of the Hanford nuclear reservation will take even longer. That’s the bottom line of a series of regional public comment meetings kicking off Wednesday in Richland, Washington.


Hundreds of people turned out Wednesday for a hearing on a controversial propane export terminal proposed at the Port of Portland.

The Canadian company Pembina plans to transport more than a million gallons of liquid propane by train each day to a terminal on the Columbia River. The fuel would be stored in tanks and piped onto export ships bound for Asia. But the company needs approval from the city of Portland to run a pipeline across an environmental zone.

Northwest News Network

You might have heard of “Hanford Downwinders.”

Now, a new book penned by a Northwest author tackles the stories of nuclear “downwinders” in the broader West. It hits the market in November. 

Sarah Aliabeth Fox found that radioactive contamination came from unexpected places. It would get onto workers’ clothes, it got in the air and it settled on crops hundreds of miles away. Crops that were served up on America’s dinner tables.