El Nino

Fickr Creative Commons, EcologyWA

The summer may be over, but this year’s drought isn’t. Washington state officials are predicting another warmer-than-normal winter. That could mean there won’t be enough snow to head off another year of drought.

Your Autumn Outlook: Warm and Dry

Sep 23, 2015
Flickr User Rachel Samanyi / Flickr Creative Commons

Fall officially arrived Wednesday – and the rest of the season promises to be warmer and dryer than normal. The culprit? El Nino. 

A historically strong El Niño is taking shape according to climatologists watching the Pacific Ocean. Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said during a briefing Thursday that the current El Niño has the potential to develop into one of the most potent on record by late fall or early winter.

Dean Jackson / Flickr

Warm, dry weather will probably continue in the Pacific Northwest--and may last until at least next spring.

All signs are pointing to a strong El Niño developing by this fall according to an update from the National Weather Service Thursday.

NOAA Climate Prediction Center

The supercomputers at the Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center have crunched long-term trends to produce an outlook for June, July and August. For most of the Northwest, the forecast gives a strong probability of above-normal temperatures. 

National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center

Rain may be in the forecast for much of the region tonight and tomorrow, but the Northwest is in for a drier than normal winter. That's according to an updated long-term forecast released Thursday by the National Weather Service.

Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Weather forecasters say the current dry spell in the Northwest may turn into a dry winter. But the region’s ski areas aren’t buying it. They’re banking on enough snowfall for winter sports.