Digital

Perhaps in your attic or basement there is a box of papers — letters, photographs, cards, maybe even journals — inherited from a grandparent or other relative who's passed on. Authors, archivists and researchers have long considered these treasures. The right box might contain a wealth of information about a key historical period or place or person.

But what if that box isn't a box at all? What if it's an ancient laptop? And if we are starting to leave behind an increasingly digital inheritance, will it die as soon as the hard drive does?

The Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University recently was host to a special day-long discussion of the information landscape in Washington with a particular emphasis on the information needs of the rural population.

The Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University recently was host to a special day-long discussion of the information landscape in Washington with a particular emphasis on the information needs of the rural population. 

The landscape is, in many ways, an enigma.  A state that is an acknowledged world leader in digital technologies has some areas where there is virtually no digital access.  The big cities—clustered in four areas—have ample electronic and print news coverage.  But vast areas of rural Washington have very little.

Click on the links above for parts 4-6 of the discussion. (Here are parts 1-3)

Photo by Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

This summer’s blockbuster line-up is teeming with highly anticipated names -- like Batman, Spiderman, and the Avengers. That’s good news for the people who run cinemas. But for many small theaters across the Northwest, opening weekend is becoming a struggle.

More movies are starting to come on hard drives instead of reels. So theaters must make a costly conversion to digital if they want to stay in the game. And, as Jessica Robinson reports, time is running out.