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Fans of Democrat Hillary Clinton braved pelting rain Friday to hear her speak in Seattle. They paid at least $250 each to get in but that didn't dampen their spirits either.

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The ballots have both the Republican and Democratic presidential candidates on them, even though the Democrats already held their caucus a couple of weeks ago.

Washington Lt. Governor Brad Owen hasn’t announced if he intends to seek a sixth-term next year. But he already faces challenges from two fellow Democrats who are betting he won’t run.

Democrats in the Oregon Senate say they'll take advantage of their bigger majorities right out of the gate this session.

Idaho Democrats predict more common ground than usual at the state Capitol this year.

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The battle for control of the Washington State Senate is getting a lot of attention. But all Washington House members are also up for re-election this year.

Currently Democrats hold 55 seats – 50 is a majority. In recent years, Republicans have been closing the gap. If Republicans were to pick up two or three more seats, that could amplify the voices of swing district Democrats.

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A Republican coalition has a narrow margin of control in the Washington state Senate. Democrats hope to change that. Millions of dollars are pouring into key races around the state. Just who’s trying to buy your vote?

The 45th legislative district cuts an arc through Kirkland, Woodinville and Sammamish on Seattle’s east side. More money has flooded into this district trying to influence who gets elected state senator here, than anywhere else in Washington. More than two million dollars at last count.

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California billionaire Tom Steyer is poised to help Democrats try to win back control of the Washington Senate. But first, his NextGen political action committee had to satisfy a quirk in the law. Call it the ten-ten rule. In Washington, political committees have to jump a small hurdle before they can play in Washington’s political sandbox.

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Washington voters have until 8 p.m. Tuesday to turn in their primary ballots. Secretary of State Kim Wyman projects turnout of about 40 percent. Among others, the primary will winnow the crowded fields for an open central Washington Congressional seat and a Seattle-area state Senate position. Olympia Correspondent Austin Jenkins has details.