Conservation

Wildlife Forensics
7:32 am
Fri May 25, 2012

In Ashland, A Crime Lab For 34,000 Species

The illegal trade of wildlife is big business- worth an estimated $5 billion a year, and growing. But who do you call to investigate a crime when the victim is an elephant, or a butterfly?

Turns out, there’s only one forensics team in the world that can handle crimes involving thousands of rare and endangered species. The team works at the U.S Fish and Wildlife Forensics Lab in Ashland, Oregon. The lab isn’t open to the public. But reporter Amelia Templeton got a glimpse inside.

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Water Conservation
6:38 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Water Conservation Linked to Energy

A Northwest environmental group is offering a new reason to conserve water: it’s a way to save energy and shrink your carbon footprint. Aaron Kunz explains.

Conservation group Idaho Rivers United monitored 15 water providers in western Idaho to see how much energy they used. It’s the first research of its kind in the country -- and it’s attracting attention.

Liz Paul of Idaho Rivers United says the group hopes the information gives the public a new way of thinking about the water they use.

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Climate Change Adaptation
6:09 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Study Indicates Some Animals Can't Outpace Climate Change

A study released Monday by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences indicates that some mammals might be unable to keep up with environmental changes. Aaron Kunz explains what that means for the Pacific Northwest.

The study looked at nearly 500 species in North and South America. It determined that close to 10 percent will not be able change habitat in order to keep pace with climate change.

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Salmon Hatcheries
6:11 am
Mon May 14, 2012

New Research: Hatchery Salmon Posing Problems For Wild Stocks

In the early part of the 20th century, when many Northwestern rivers were dammed, fish hatcheries provided a way to keep salmon in rivers. But now an estimated 5 billion hatchery fish are released into the Pacific every year. A collection of research released Monday highlights possible concerns about how all those hatchery fish might be impacting wild stocks. Ashley Ahearn reports.

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Logging Lawsuit
5:57 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Conservation Groups Sue to Stop Logging Project

Conservation organizations will proceed with a legal challenge of the Goose Logging Project in the McKenzie River Watershed in the Willamette National Forest. KLCC's Christina Kempster has more on the story.

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Rescued Owls
6:37 am
Mon May 7, 2012

The Case of the Great Horned Owl Mix Up

Western Screech Owlets at Washington State University.
Photo by Courtney Flatt Northwest News Network

Nine fluffy owlets recently turned up at Washington State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Doctors thought the babies looked like great horned owls. But to their surprise, the owlets turned out to be an even more unusual species. As correspondent Courtney Flatt reports, help poured in from around the country to solve the tiny owls’ identity crisis.

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Northwest Beekeeping
6:40 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Care To Borrow A Bee?

From her individual cage the queen bee emits pheromones to convert worker bees into her loyal subjects so they don't kill her when she's released into the hive.
Photo by Ashley Ahearn Northwest News Network

Honeybees have run into some trouble. Diseases, funguses and pesticides are just some of the factors scientists believe may be contributing to the decline of these insects nation-wide. But honeybees play a critical role in pollinating everything from the Washington apple crop to the flowers in your back yard. Ashley Ahearn reports on one booming business that’s bringing bees back to the urban environment. Care to borrow a bee?

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Bird Conservation
5:55 am
Fri April 27, 2012

Birders and Burgers: An Unlikely High Desert Partnership

Willy Land and Larry Anderson, right, ready their horses in the early-morning to gather cattle from rangeland for a branding. The ranchland they’re working is within a few miles of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.
Photo by Anna King Northwest News Network

In the remote valleys of southeast Oregon both birds and cattle flourish. This is where mountain streams feed an oasis of lakes and marshes in the high desert. Cattle ranchers and wildlife advocates have been fighting over that valuable grassland for decades. Now, they’ve struck a delicate truce that keeps both birds and burgers in mind. Correspondent Anna King has our story from way outside of Burns, Oregon.

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Oregon Forest Road Plan
5:52 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Forest Service Drops Plan to Shrink Road Network in Wallowa-Whitman Forest

Forest Service officials in northeast Oregon have announced they will put on hold a plan to close forest roads. Amelia Templeton reports.

The plan was to go into effect this summer. It would have made about half the roads in the Wallowa-Whitman forest off limits to cars and off road vehicles. The goals: protect habitat and create a more efficient road network. But local residents protested.

Mac Huff is a fishing guide in Joseph, Ore. He says closing the roads would create problems for hunters. And make it harder for him to find fuel for his wood stove.

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Wolf Poaching
5:38 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Wash. Hunter Pleads Guilty To Wolf Poaching Conspiracy

Yearling wolf from the Lookout Pack in Okanogan County
Photo courtesy of Conservation Northwest

TWISP, Wash. -- A Twisp, Washington man has changed his plea to guilty in a high-profile federal wolf poaching case. As part of a plea agreement, the 62-year-old man will not go to prison. The lack of jail time greatly disappoints a conservation group. Correspondent Tom Banse has more on the story.

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