Commentaries

Border Collies are consistently named the most intelligent of all dogs. Is their intelligence simply a matter of nature, or is there some nurture involved as well? Dr. Kirsten Peters wonders about the answer.

A look at the roots of the violence erupting in the Arab world in a commentary from Lawrence Pintak, the founding dean of the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at WSU and a leading Middle East scholar.

Regrets

Sep 14, 2012

You know that saying, “No regrets?” It seems like a good way to live. But  NWPR commentator Corinna Nicolaou, says it’s not for her. She would rather keep all those regrets close by.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog.

What A Drag

Jul 27, 2012
Photo courtesy Washington State University

I swim laps at noon several times a week. I enjoy the water, and the gentle exercise is good for my aging joints.

Like other old ladies in the pool, I’m no speed demon. Even a bucketful of performance enhancing drugs would not make me slice through the water quickly. But like all the lap swimmers I know, slow or fast, I take an interest in Michael Phelps and the other American swimmers soon to compete in London in the 2012 Summer Olympics.

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

When you were a kid, did you sneak candies and hide the wrappers so your parents wouldn't find the evidence? Commentator Corinna Nicolaou did too. As we head into the 4th of July weekend here's a story of rebellion, and the sweet land of liberty, as a child sees it.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou: An Ode To Melons

Jun 20, 2012

Today is the first day of summer, and the weather is warm. NWPR commentator Corinna Nicolaou, she’s been waiting all winter long to taste summer, but she’s not craving BBQ!

Victory Over The Angel Of Death

Jun 15, 2012
Photo courtesy Washington State University

In a 1789 letter, Benjamin Franklin wrote: "In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes." Well, it should interest you to know that death is no longer a certainty, at least for one species. The Rock Doc, Dr. Kirsten Peters, has the details.

"The gene for death has been isolated –and reversed- by scientists. Not a bad day’s work, you might say.

Sorry, it’s not the death of human beings that’s at issue. But it is a gene for death that’s embedded in a plant on which we all directly depend each day. And that’s good enough to be plenty encouraging.

Rock Doc: Our Daily Bread In 2050

Apr 26, 2012
Washington State University

One of my habits in recent years has been studying climate history in my free time. What can I say; it keeps me out of bars.

Recently, I was startled to learn that the temperatures experienced by American wheat farms back in the 1830s were almost 7 degrees warmer than they now are.

Dr. Lawrence Pintak, Founding Dean of The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication, responds to the recent This American Life controversy surrounding their story on Apple's manufacturing practices in China. This commentary appeared today in the Columbia Journalism Review.

Photo credit: Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

In today's economy, many Americans have to get by on less.  That means learning new strategies for saving money and living without.  NWPR commentator Corinna Nicolaou talks about growing up poor, and the ways in which wealth may really be a state of mind.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

With Egypt racked by internal turmoil, as the country's transitional military council appears determined to hold on to power, many in the West worry about the future of democracy there. Middle East expert Dr. Lawrence Pintak, founding dean of the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University, is currently visiting Indonesia. He covered that country's 1998 revolution and he reflects on the lessons Indonesia holds for Egypt today.

I Feel Better Now

Feb 7, 2012
Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

We all have our failures, the things we regret… and maybe don’t want anyone to know about. 

Northwest Public Radio commentator Corinna Nicolaou  talks about failing in her youth, and how that failure drove her to succeed.
 

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Washington State University

With a good six weeks of winter left, flu vaccines are still in demand. While many see the benefits of vaccines, others are less sure. Dr. E. Kirsten Peters, the Rock Doc, weighs in on the efficacy and safety of a prominent feature of life in the 21st century.

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Facing the prospect of a turkey-less Thanksgiving?  Northwest Public Radio commentator Corinna Nicolaou was too when she became a vegetarian. She wondered how the meal could be delicious without meat infused gravy. Then she discovered the secret: vegetarian doesn't have to mean healthy...

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Imagine that one of your earliest childhood memories is of blood, screaming, and chainsaws. That’s the case for commentator Corinna Nicolaou as she remembers a massacre!

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Corinna shares how she didn't get her name. Her original name, that is.  A name inspired by the 60s and space... a name her father loved, but was convinced by his mother that the name needed to come down to earth.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Bad plastic surgery... Michael Jackson, Kenny Rogers, Mt. Rushmore? Commentator Corinna Nicolaou shares her up close visit at Mt. Rushmore and is taken aback by concrete and nose jobs.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

As a kid, did you dream about what your life would be like as a grown up? Maybe you were going to be a baseball player or you dreamt of wearing high heeled shoes? Commentator Corinna Nicolaou dreamed of fresh vacuum lines and paid bills.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

As a young girl, commentator Corinna Nicolaou's silent dream was to have a relationship with animals like Snow White. She gets her wish, and a rabies shot too.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Corinna recalls the excitement of being a little girl on a date with her dad, and how, through the eyes of a seven-year-old, she understood  why they ended.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

What does laundry have to do with feminism? Corinna's grandmother says even feminists have to do laundry.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Have you ever struggled with finding the perfect gift for that special someone? For NWPR commentator Corinna Nicolaou one gift offered a lesson in letting go.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Did you have a fascination with fire stations as a child? The red trucks...and the fireman themselves? For Northwest commentaor Corinna Nicolaou, the fascination was also a desire to connect with her father.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Many people have a New Year's resolution to de-clutter their lives. That's not the case for Northwest Public Radio commentator Corinna Nicolaou. Custom shelves were needed to store her husband's things from childhood.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

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