Cassandra Profita / EarthFix

Students around the Northwest go to school every day in portable classrooms. These classrooms are an affordable solution to budget-strapped districts that need more space. But they can be bad for student health and performance. That’s why some districts are moving away from portable classrooms.

One district in Spokane has found a solution.

Courtney Flatt brings us part 2 of our special series "Inside the Box."

Katie Campbell / EarthFix

Thousands of students in Washington and Oregon go to school in what are known as “portable classrooms."

These temporary structures were a quick solution to the problem of growing population and lack of funding for school facilities in parts of the Northwest.

But many of these “temporary” structures are still around. They’re not environmentally friendly or healthy places for students to learn.

Julia Flucht / Northwest News Network

All kinds of online marketplaces offer you a way to sell your stuff. eBay, CraigsList, Etsy. But what about a place to sell your skills and expertise? Now sites like Udemy, Skillshare, and are in a race to become the School of Everything. But as more courses appear, the competition among teachers is intensifying. 

Photo by: Jessica Robinson

The kind of finely tuned data crunching that fueled the 2012 election is spreading to another venue: the classroom.

Idaho high school students won't have to take online classes to graduate. The State Board of Education repealed a rule Monday that required them. Voters rejected the Students Come First laws on November 6 but one of those laws had a twist. It required the board of education to set the online class requirement, which it did.

Photo Credit: Jessica Robinson

Idaho voters delivered a resounding defeat to three new education laws. Voters said no to limits on teacher bargaining rights, to creating a pay-for-performance system and to ramping up classroom technology. Opponents were successful, in part, by billing the laws as an attack on teachers.

Malheur County: Lots Of Land, Very Few Jobs

Aug 8, 2012
Photo by David Benbennick / Wikimedia Commons

Malheur County has the highest poverty rate in Oregon and the tenth highest in the U.S. Oregon Public Broadcasting's Amanda Peacher spoke with some of the county’s low-income residents, and filed this report on how they’re making ends meet.