cancer

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

When women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer, doctors usually try specific drugs first, and therapies like chemotherapy. But new research could eventually give patients treatments that target their specific tumor.

Cancer Can't / www.facebook.com/cancercant.info

Picture this: You have a cabinet full of expensive, potentially life-saving medication, but you can’t use it. Do you just throw them away or is there another solution?

 

ROBERT HOOD / / FRED HUTCH NEWS SERVICE PHOTO

 Vice President Joe Biden toured Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Monday. His visit is part of the White House's $1 billion proposal for a new initiative to cure cancer.

Binsar Bakkara / Associated Press

An international report on the health risks of a commonly used herbicide is raising special concerns about farmworkers and cancer.

Glyphosate is the active ingredient in the weed-killer Roundup. A study by the World Health Organization has found limited evidence that glyphosate is probably capable of causing cancer in humans.

Chuck Benbrook studies pesticides at Washington State University. He said the new report could be bad news for farmworkers.

In his own words, Sammy Davis, Jr. was "the only black, Puerto Rican, one-eyed, Jewish entertainer in the world."

His daughter, Tracey Davis, shares memories and details of his life in her new book, Sammy Davis Jr.: A Personal Journey with My Father. It's based on conversations Davis had with her father as he battled throat cancer near the end of his life.

A few years ago, the cartoonist Matt Freedman started having nagging pain around his ear. He bought mouth guards and tried pain relievers, but nothing seemed to work. Slowly, the pain got worse. In 2012, a bump appeared on his neck. It was a slow-growing, dangerous cancer that had already spread to his lungs.

When Good Morning America co-anchor Robin Roberts was a little girl, whenever she'd complain to her mother about how unfair life was, her mother would say, "Oh, everybody's got something."

Years later, in 2007, Roberts was diagnosed with breast cancer. "I had that moment of: Wow, I can't believe I'm going through this. Why is this happening to me?" she tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "And my mother ... sweetly and gently — said to me, 'Honey, everybody's got something.' And it just really stuck with me."

A few years ago, Morning Edition interviewed President Obama at the White House. At the time, it was a major news story, but there was another story going on behind the scenes.

Madhulika Sikka, now the executive editor of NPR News, had accompanied the team to the White House, and while NPR's Steve Inskeep was talking to the president, Sikka was waiting on a phone call from her doctor. She had been warned a few days before that the news might not be good.

Officials at Oregon's largest medical center want state lawmakers to help fund a massive expansion of their cancer research facility.

The government's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program (SEER) tracks state cancer incidence and mortality rates. So it was only natural that George Johnson would pore over their latest data to gain some insight for his incisive new book, The Cancer Chronicles: Unlocking Medicine's Deepest Mystery. "Concentrating on overall cancer rates can smear over some interesting details," he writes, "and I wondered what might be lurking underneath."

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