budget

OLYMPIA, Wash. – On the campaign trail, Washington Governor Jay Inslee talked about financing education by growing the economy. Now the Democrat proposes to raise $1.2 billion for schools by extending some tax increases and ending some tax breaks.

In Spokane last June I moderated the first gubernatorial debate between Jay Inslee and Rob McKenna. And I put this question to both candidates: if elected, would you ask voters to support a new tax for schools to respond to the Washington Supreme Court’s ruling that the state is not adequately funding education.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee wants to close or curtail a dozen tax breaks and continue a couple of tax increases that are about to expire. The money raised – more than a billion dollars – would be earmarked for public schools. The plan unveiled Thursday is part of the Democrat’s budget priorities for the next two years. Olympia Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – More than 100 health care advocates gathered in Olympia in support of Medicaid expansion Thursday. It coincided with an announcement by Gov. Jay Inslee, unveiling his budget priorities. His proposal includes an expansion of Medicaid.

That pleases Lauren Granger, a healthcare worker at the rally.

“I really hope that the legislature hears this message and isn’t pinching pennies in the wrong place and just have it be more expensive later on,” she says.

SALEM, Ore. – Public employees in Oregon are voicing their objections to a measure aimed at cutting the cost of public pensions. They packed a legislative hearing in Salem Wednesday. Legislative budget-writers have floated a proposal that would limit cost of living increases for retired workers.

James Jacobsen is an administrative assistant in the College of Education at the University of Oregon. He expects to retire in about four years. And he says lawmakers are looking for cash in the wrong place.

Jessica Paterson / Flickr

Democrats in the Oregon legislature are bracing themselves for a backlash against a public pension cost cutting proposal they released Monday. The plan would create a sliding scale to cap cost of living increases for retired public workers. Budget-writers hope to apply the savings to education funding.

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Budget writers in Olympia are breathing a sigh of relief. Despite the federal sequester and other risks to the economy, the state’s new revenue forecast out Wednesday is mostly flat. Even so, Washington lawmakers still face a $1 billion-plus shortfall and a court-ordered down payment for public schools.

Washington Senate Majority Wants More Higher Ed Funding

Mar 19, 2013

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The mostly Republican majority in the Washington state Senate want to spend an extra $300 million on higher education. Tuesday, Republican budget-writers unveiled a plan that would increase money universities receive and fully fund the state’s prepaid tuition program.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Washington’s nearly $1 billion shortfall could grow after Wednesday’s revenue forecast. The state already faces higher than expected Medicaid costs. It’s widely expected the March forecast will show revenues coming in lower than expected. The governor and legislative budget writers have been waiting to see what the forecast brings before they roll out their spending proposals.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Hopes for a rosier budget outlook in Washington are dimming. Expected savings in Medicaid haven’t materialized. And many state lawmakers expect this week’s quarterly revenue forecast to show a downward slide. Add to that, a Supreme Court ruling that requires more funding for schools.

In response, Democratic Governor Jay Inslee is expected to announce soon a list of tax “loopholes” – as he calls them – he wants to eliminate to fund schools. But closing tax exemptions is easier said than done.

Murray At Center Stage Guiding Democratic Budget Plan

Mar 13, 2013
U.S. Senate

Washington U.S. Senator Patty Murray took center stage in the other Washington Wednesday. She’s the new chair the U.S. Senate’s budget committee. In that role, Murray outlined the Democrats’ 10-year plan to get the nation closer to a balanced budget.

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