budget deal

Time is running out for Washington lawmakers to pass a capital construction budget. Less than one week remains in the state’s third overtime session of the legislature.

If you have a reservation at a Washington state park this weekend or you rely on state services, you can breathe a sigh of relief. Washington lawmakers have passed a nearly $44 billion, two-year budget, averting an imminent government shutdown.

After months of partisan deadlock and weeks of brinksmanship as a government shutdown loomed, Washington legislative budget negotiators have reached an “agreement in principle” on a two-year budget designed to fully fund schools, as required by the state Supreme Court.  


There’s still no word of a budget deal in the Washington state Capitol. And a partial government shutdown is just days away. Yet lawmakers remain optimistic.

Washington’s 30-day special session of the legislature ends Tuesday. But there’s still no sign of a budget deal or a plan to fully fund education. That means Gov. Jay Inslee is expected to call a second overtime session.

Washington Senate Republicans have agreed to suspend a biology exam requirement that’s keeping nearly 2,000 high school students from graduating.

Oregon shoppers and bottled water will remain untaxed in Washington’s next two-year budget, but a couple of other tax exemptions will be eliminated.

If Washington lawmakers don’t have a budget by the end of the month, state government will shut down. But it would only be a partial shutdown.

It’s not just Washington state agencies that are preparing for a possible government shutdown on July 1. Washington House and Senate administrators will meet Wednesday to discuss contingency planning.

Budget negotiators continue to meet at the Washington capitol, but there’s still no deal on a spending plan for the next two years.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee said Wednesday there’s still “a lot of mileage to cover” as budget talks continue in Olympia. But he was reluctant to characterize where negotiations stand.

Washington State Department of Enterprise Services

Monday was the eleventh day of a second special legislative session in Olympia, where Democrats and Republicans still have to hammer out the Washington state budget.

As promised, Washington Governor Jay Inslee has called an immediate second special session of the legislature. It begins Friday.

To raise or not to raise taxes? That is the question that’s pushing Washington lawmakers into a second 30-day special session.

State workers at more than 80 workplaces around Washington walked off the job Wednesday. They want lawmakers to fund pay raises promised in contracts.

Budget negotiations have stalled in Olympia and there’s still no funding to increase pay for state workers.

The nearly five percent raise would be their first in more than seven years.

Meanwhile, lawmakers are poised to get a raise twice that size later this year.

Steve Hoffman, a shop steward at North Seattle Community College, says that’s not fair.