births

Rising C-Section Rate
6:49 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Doctors Say Modern Definition Of ‘Normal’ Labor May Be Driving C-section Rate

Spokane mom Kelly with her newborn son Colton. Kelly and her doctor waited out 18 hours of labor to avoid a C-section.
Credit Contributed photo

The high rate of C-sections is a heated topic lately -- in Florida last month, one woman unsuccessfully took her hospital to federal court to avoid having one. It’s a life-saving surgery in complicated births, but today nearly a third of pregnancies end up as a C-section. Public health officials across the U.S. DO say the number of C-sections being performed has gotten way out of hand. And as Jessica Robinson reports, doctors are wondering if their definition of what a normal labor is might be one of the problems.

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Birth Defects
6:46 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Washington Health Officials Meet To Discuss Rare Birth Defect

A rare birth defect is affecting more babies in Central Washington. After hosting a series of public hearings, regulators and health officials met Monday to talk about their next steps. For EarthFix, Courtney Flatt has more.

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Birth Defects
7:42 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Washington Needs Your Help In Birth Defect Mystery

At a meeting in Kennewick, the health department asked people to raise concerns about a rare birth defect that officials may not have considered yet. Twenty-three babies were born with anencephaly in Central Washington from 2010-2013.
Credit Courtney Flatt / Earth Fix

Over the past three years, a rare birth defect has shown up Central Washington at about four times the national average. Now, the state health department is turning to the public for clues about what’s causing the fatal defect. For EarthFix, Courtney Flatt has more.

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Birth Defects
5:27 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Listening Session Scheduled About Central Wash. Birth Defects

Three counties in Central Washington have seen an unsually high number of babies born with anencephaly from 2010-2013. No one is sure of the cause. Taking prenatal folic acid is one way to prevent the fatal birth defect.
Credit Ragesoss / Wikimedia Commons

Over the past three years, central Washington has seen unusually high numbers of babies born with a rare birth defect. No one has determined a cause. Public health officials are holding two listening sessions this week to learn more from community members.

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Healthcare Costs
6:23 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Washington State Pays For More Than Half Of Births

Austin Jenkins Northwest News Network

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 4:42 pm

SHELTON, Wash. - It’s one of the most vexing problems state lawmakers face: how to curb the rising cost of healthcare. In Washington, there’s one specific line item in the healthcare budget that’s startling, but few at the Capitol are talking about: taxpayers now foot the bill for more than half of all births in Washington. But why is that number is so high?

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Full Term Births Increase
5:24 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

Fewer Pre-Term Babies In Washington

Premature births add increased risk of lifelong complications.
USAID USAID

Mothers in Washington are carrying their babies longer in the womb to protect against complications. Just a few years ago, if a baby was born at 37 weeks which is two weeks early it was still considered full-term. Now, research has shown babies born two weeks early are more likely to have medical problems.

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Idaho Contraception Stance
3:17 pm
Fri March 23, 2012

Idaho Lawmakers Reject New Contraception Policy

Republican Representative Carlos Bilbao of Emmett sponsored a joint memorial on the House floor to have the current contraception policy reversed.
Idaho House of Representatives

Religious beliefs and contraception collided today in the Idaho House of Representatives. a majority of state lawmakers voted to send a message to the President and U.S. Congress to reject a new birth control policy.

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National Contraception Policy
5:11 am
Wed March 14, 2012

Idaho Lawmakers Weigh In On National Contraception Policy

The Idaho State Capitol Building.
Photo by Mark Kobayashi-Hillary Wikimedia Commons

BOISE, Idaho -- Some Idaho lawmakers are weighing in on a national debate over whether religious institutions should be required to provide birth control coverage to employees. Samantha Wright reports.

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