birds

20th Annual Eagle Celebration Set For This Weekend

Feb 20, 2015
AP Images

When the annual Eagle Watch event began twenty years ago, eagles were in danger of extinction. Today, the birds of prey are thriving in many parts of the Northwest and have been removed from the Endangered Species List.

Colder weather forecasted for the weekend makes for better eagle-watching, says state park ranger Erin Bennett.

"They actually have over 7,000 feathers on their body," Bennett says. "When it's cold and windy that seems to be the time that they like to be out there. They're really visible and they do mate for life so you often see pairs flying together."

Second Strain Of Avian Flu Arrives In Oregon

Jan 15, 2015
jlcummins / Flickr

Wildlife officials in Oregon say a mallard duck shot by a hunter near Eugene has tested positive for avian flu.

The strain of influenza is relatively common in Europe and Asia and has not caused any human sickness. The flu does not appear to cause illness in wild waterfowl, which have evolved with the virus. But it could kill falcons and hawks, as well as domesticated birds.

Oregon officials say they are not surprised this strain of avian flu has arrived in the state. Wild birds in Washington, California and Utah have also tested positive.

Several major markets for U.S. poultry products have shut down trade after discoveries of avian flu in the west -- including the Tri-Cities, Washington.

Joanna Lanning / Friends of Pioneer Park Aviary

Walla Walla’s Pioneer Park is known not for its trees or pond, but for its birds - dozens of them in cages or in large pond enclosures. For more than 30 years, it’s held a collection of peacocks, ducks, pheasants, and more. Now there’s a chance it could close at the end of August.

Officials at five dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers will start killing birds that eat migrating juvenile salmon. They are meant to protect endangered salmon and steelhead as they begin their journey out to sea.

Study Finds Urban Stresses Cause Birds To Abandon Eggs

May 14, 2013
Boise State University

A bird of prey can get so stressed out by city noise, it will abandon its nest – with eggs still in it. That's according to a new study by researchers at Boise State University. The study suggests human disturbances affect the American kestrel more than previously thought. Jessica Robinson reports.

Photo by Anna King / Northwest News Network

In the remote valleys of southeast Oregon both birds and cattle flourish. This is where mountain streams feed an oasis of lakes and marshes in the high desert. Cattle ranchers and wildlife advocates have been fighting over that valuable grassland for decades. Now, they’ve struck a delicate truce that keeps both birds and burgers in mind. Correspondent Anna King has our story from way outside of Burns, Oregon.