Bald eagle

20th Annual Eagle Celebration Set For This Weekend

Feb 20, 2015
AP Images

When the annual Eagle Watch event began twenty years ago, eagles were in danger of extinction. Today, the birds of prey are thriving in many parts of the Northwest and have been removed from the Endangered Species List.

Colder weather forecasted for the weekend makes for better eagle-watching, says state park ranger Erin Bennett.

"They actually have over 7,000 feathers on their body," Bennett says. "When it's cold and windy that seems to be the time that they like to be out there. They're really visible and they do mate for life so you often see pairs flying together."

Justin Wilde, Mission Support Alliance

For the first time in more than 50 years, the Hanford nuclear reservation is now home to two baby bald eagles. Wildlife biologists say this is a good sign for bald eagles and for the area.

Photo by Katherine Whitmore / USFWS

Few sounds symbolize American patriotism like the piercing shrill of a bald eagle. But just like George Washington and his cherry tree, that majestic call … is a myth. As correspondent Jessica Robinson found, the screech associated with the bald eagle, in fact, belongs to a different bird.

Photo credit: USFWS / USFWS

Bald eagles are no longer considered threatened by the state of Oregon. The state's Fish and Wildlife Commission voted Friday to remove the iconic bird from the state list of endangered species.