The madcap flotilla of engineless boats entered in the Race to Alaska is safely moored in Victoria. Stage one of the 750-mile adventure race from Port Townsend, Washington, to Ketchikan is in the books.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Forty-three teams will cast off from Port Townsend, Washington, Thursday for the second running of an epic marine adventure contest. The 750-mile Race to Alaska has just a few rules: no motors, for one. And no chase boats or support crews. Last year, race co-founder Jake Beattie made the comparison to another great race.


The tsunami that struck Japan four years ago sent about five million tons of debris into the Pacific Ocean. On Friday, workers started unloading one million pounds of that debris that arrived by barge in south Seattle.

An Anchorage-based commuter airline is opening a new hub in Portland. Peninsula Airways, better known as PenAir, is a well-established Alaska carrier that only recently branched out to the Lower 48.

Tome Banse / Northwest News Network

The first stage of the inaugural 750-mile Race to Alaska -- a novel endurance race up the Inside Passage -- has thinned the field.

Tom Banse

 A large crowd of onlookers gathered at dawn Thursday morning in Port Townsend to send off the captains and crews entered in a new adventure race. The nautical contest runs 750 miles up the Inside Passage to Ketchikan, Alaska.

Ingrid Taylar

A wild collection of sail and paddle-powered boats has assembled in Port Townsend, Washington for the inaugural Race to Alaska. The 750-mile adventure race from Puget Sound to Ketchikan begins at dawn Thursday. Among the 33 teams entered is a 6-person outrigger canoe. Mackenzie Punter is with that Victoria-based crew, named Team Soggy Beavers.

A souped-up paddle board, custom rowing craft and high performance, carbon fiber sailboats are just some of the eye-catching entries in the inaugural Race to Alaska.

Tribe OKs Same-Sex Marriages

Feb 24, 2015

The Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska’s new policy defined marriage in its tribal courts as between two people, regardless of gender.

About a quarter of its nearly 30,000 members live in the Pacific Northwest.

President Richard Peterson said the council is exercising its governing authority to include more tribal members.

"It’s not just about the same-sex marriage and helping just one segment of our tribal citizens, but all of our tribal citizens," Peterson said.

Ed Schoenfeld / Northwest News Network

A Native American-owned corporation with thousands of shareholders in the Pacific Northwest has new leadership. The Alaska-based business is trying to bounce back from heavy losses. CoastAlaska’s Ed Schoenfeld reports from Juneau.

Shawn Murphy / Flickr

Senator Maria Cantwell wants the White House to stop a proposed mine in Alaska that she says will threaten jobs in Washington state. The proposed Pebble Mine, in Western Alaska, sits near Bristol Bay, which is one of the world’s most abundant salmon habitats. About 1,000 Washington residents hold commercial fishing permits there. At a rally at Fisherman’s Terminal in Seattle, Cantwell described the mine as a “giant cauldron of toxic waste.”

Shell Oil had to postpone its Arctic drilling for a full year after one of its oil rigs ran aground off the Alaska coast this winter. But Shell’s efforts to open a new frontier of oil exploration in the Arctic Ocean continue in Puget Sound. The oil giant passed a key test with federal regulators last month in the waters off Anacortes, Washington. KUOW’s John Ryan reports.

Northwest News Network

Another costly setback for Shell Oil and its efforts to drill in the Arctic Ocean: Shell needs to send its beleaguered oil rigs to Asia for major repairs, instead of to Seattle as planned. KUOW’s John Ryan reports.

Photo by Jon Klingenberg / U.S. Coast Guard

The Obama Administration announced a sweeping inquiry into Shell Oil’s Arctic drilling program yesterday. The 60-day probe will look at the company’s mishaps in Alaska and here in Puget Sound. KUOW’s John Ryan reports.

An Alaska man accused of murdering an elderly Chehalis couple in 1985 is awaiting extradition to Lewis County, Wash. Police say the arrest of Rick Riffe of King Salmon, Alaska, closes a cold case investigation that spans 26 years.

Bristol Bay, in Southwestern Alaska, is the home of one of the world’s largest runs of Sockeye salmon. In fact, all five types of salmon spawn in the bay’s freshwater tributaries.

Bristol Bay could also become the home of a new mine to extract copper, gold and other minerals.

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a risk assessment study on how mining could impact the ecosystem there. The Agency will hold a public hearing in Seattle Thursday.

Ashley Ahearn reports that fishermen in the Northwest are watching the process closely.

Pets And Wildlife Deliver YouTube Stardom To Alaska Woman

Mar 30, 2012

UNALASKA, Alaska - One of the quirks of the internet age is how some home videos become unexpected global sensations. In 'net lingo, it's called "going viral." This week's examples of that genre include a humorous clip of house cats and neighborhood wildlife gathered on a porch in the remote Aleutian town of Unalaska. KUCB’s Alexandra Gutierrez reports on the unlikely Internet stardom of a woman who just filmed out her door.

StoryCorps Northwest

Life in Seward, Alaska wasn't easy for English major Amy Buckler and her husband. They had a tough time making ends meet. One day, they decided to leave and start a new life in Oregon with their young daughter. In today's StoryCorps Amy tells her now 10-year-old daughter, Mina Black, about a trip that would prove tougher than they'd ever expected.