Alaska

The madcap flotilla of engineless boats entered in the Race to Alaska is safely moored in Victoria. Stage one of the 750-mile adventure race from Port Townsend, Washington, to Ketchikan is in the books.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Forty-three teams will cast off from Port Townsend, Washington, Thursday for the second running of an epic marine adventure contest. The 750-mile Race to Alaska has just a few rules: no motors, for one. And no chase boats or support crews. Last year, race co-founder Jake Beattie made the comparison to another great race.

DVIDSHUB / Flickr

The tsunami that struck Japan four years ago sent about five million tons of debris into the Pacific Ocean. On Friday, workers started unloading one million pounds of that debris that arrived by barge in south Seattle.

An Anchorage-based commuter airline is opening a new hub in Portland. Peninsula Airways, better known as PenAir, is a well-established Alaska carrier that only recently branched out to the Lower 48.

Tome Banse / Northwest News Network

The first stage of the inaugural 750-mile Race to Alaska -- a novel endurance race up the Inside Passage -- has thinned the field.

Tom Banse

 A large crowd of onlookers gathered at dawn Thursday morning in Port Townsend to send off the captains and crews entered in a new adventure race. The nautical contest runs 750 miles up the Inside Passage to Ketchikan, Alaska.

Ingrid Taylar

A wild collection of sail and paddle-powered boats has assembled in Port Townsend, Washington for the inaugural Race to Alaska. The 750-mile adventure race from Puget Sound to Ketchikan begins at dawn Thursday. Among the 33 teams entered is a 6-person outrigger canoe. Mackenzie Punter is with that Victoria-based crew, named Team Soggy Beavers.

A souped-up paddle board, custom rowing craft and high performance, carbon fiber sailboats are just some of the eye-catching entries in the inaugural Race to Alaska.

Tribe OKs Same-Sex Marriages

Feb 24, 2015
Wikimedia

The Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska’s new policy defined marriage in its tribal courts as between two people, regardless of gender.

About a quarter of its nearly 30,000 members live in the Pacific Northwest.

President Richard Peterson said the council is exercising its governing authority to include more tribal members.

"It’s not just about the same-sex marriage and helping just one segment of our tribal citizens, but all of our tribal citizens," Peterson said.

Ed Schoenfeld / Northwest News Network

A Native American-owned corporation with thousands of shareholders in the Pacific Northwest has new leadership. The Alaska-based business is trying to bounce back from heavy losses. CoastAlaska’s Ed Schoenfeld reports from Juneau.

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