Agriculture

ForestWander / Wikimedia Commons

Washington wildlife managers say the hunt for a pack of grey wolves is over. A state marksman killed the alpha male of the pack Thursday in far northeast Washington. The department has killed a total of seven wolves from the Wedge Pack since August.

Dennis Stern / USFS Gila National Forest

Evacuation notices around the Northwest have subsided as fire crews beat back the threat of wildfire to homes and subdivisions.

Northwest News Network

Washington wildlife officials killed three more grey wolves near the Canadian border Wednesday . That brings the total kill to five this week. The state’s decision to take out an entire wolf pack is causing blowback for state wildlife managers, and for one environmental organization that supported the action.

Daily Inter Lake / FWS

The group that's asking Oregon voters to ban the use of gillnets along the Columbia River says it's suspending its ballot measure campaign. The sponsors of the measure say they're instead backing a separate effort by Oregon’s governor to do essentially the same thing.

Anne Burgess / Wikimedia Commons

Washington state apple farmers have the second largest crop in history but too few pickers to get it all in this harvest. A worker shortage means there won’t be enough people to get the fruit off the trees quickly enough.

State officials have called off orders to kill four members of a wolf pack in Northeastern Washington. Ashley Ahearn reports.

Oregon Drug Enforcement Administration

The state of Oregon is on the lookout for fraudulent fertilizer. State regulators say it’s a growing problem for indoor gardeners. The Oregon Department of Agriculture recently cracked down on a California company that it says was selling a potentially harmful product.

Firefighters have mostly contained the Holloway fire, a massive blaze on the Oregon-Nevada border. But Amelia Templeton of Earthfix reports there is still no clear solution for the cattle left homeless by Oregon’s summer fires.

Photo by Courtney Flatt / EarthFix

A small ranch in southeastern Washington is the site of some big disputes playing out between environmental regulators and farmers.

The question: How much control can the government have over pollution from agricultural runoff?

As part of EarthFix and Investigate West’s series on the 40th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act, Courtney Flatt takes a look at a court case that could determine how strictly the state regulates polluted rainwater runoff.

Photo by Anna King / Northwest News Network

Drought that’s sizzling the rest of the nation has largely left the Northwest states alone. Furthermore, the Midwest’s farmers’ misfortune is actually benefiting farmers here. That’s because grain prices are raising because of the Heartland’s decimated yields. Correspondent Anna King has this report from central Washington’s grain country.

Wheat stubble, grain elevators and whole lot of wide open – that’s Connell, Washington.

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