Agriculture

Northwest Wheat Harvest Could Be Down This Summer

Jun 20, 2014
jayneandd / Flickr

Northwest farmers are expected to harvest less wheat this summer. The projections indicate a down year in Oregon, Idaho and Washington.

Courtney Flatt / EarthFix

When you think of grapes in the Northwest, wine is probably the first thing that comes to mind. But Concord juice grapes actually are Washington’s most widely planted grape. It turns out, juice grapes are more susceptible to warming weather than their wine grape cousins. For EarthFix, Courtney Flatt has more.

Not Much Refuge In Klamath Basin For Migratory Birds

Jun 11, 2014
EarthFix

A prolonged drought is putting pressure on water supplies for the Klamath Basin’s wildlife refuges.

EarthFix’s Devan Schwartz reports on how the nation’s original waterfowl refuge may be too dry this summer to provide a stopover for millions of migratory birds.

Rae Ellen Bichell / KPLU

When you think organic you probably visualize crisp, sweet-smelling veggies and fruit. But it turns out that fresh food is often grown in some pretty foul fertilizer. In fact it’s so bad it’s been known to make farmworkers gag. Now, as correspondent Anna King found out, there’s one new sweeter-smelling organic option developed right here in the Northwest.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Northwest sweet cherry growers say this season they'll likely pick their third-largest haul ever. That's 20 million boxes full. But there’s plenty that can happen to cherries even the day of harvest.

Peggy Greb / USDA

The number of farms in the Northwest is dropping. That's according to newly released federal farm data. But there's more to the story. The average size and value of Northwest farms are going up.

Lildobe

Northwest researchers are teaming up to stop an invasion of stink bugs moving across the region. The bugs, which can smell like dirty gym socks, ruin tree fruit and grape vines. Those crops are vital to Northwest agriculture.

Thousands of acres of high-value cherry and apple orchards behind the damaged Wanapum Dam are at serious risk.

USDA

Northwest potato growers say they've been snubbed in a federal nutrition program. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Friday finalized changes to the Women, Infants and Children program, or WIC . And it will cover all fruits and veggies … all but potatoes.

Oregon farmers are hoping the state Legislature makes it worth their while to donate crops that would otherwise go to waste.

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