Weekend Edition Sunday on NPR & Classical Music

Sunday from 6-10 AM
Hosted by: Audie Cornish

Whether revealing events in small-town America or overseas, or profiling notable personalities, Weekend Edition from Northwest Public Radio & NPR News appreciates the extraordinary details that make up every story. Join Bruce Bradberry and other Northwest Public Radio hosts for this two-hour weekend morning newsmagazine covering hard news, a wide variety of newsmakers, and cultural stories with care, accuracy, and a wink of humor.

Weekend Edition Sunday combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. Conceived as a cross between a Sunday newspaper and CBS' Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The highlight for many listeners is the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times.

With Bruce Bradberry at Northwest Public Radio  Visit Weekend Edition Sunday at NPR.org

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Election 2012
3:29 am
Sun July 22, 2012

He's A Long Shot, But Don't Count Huckabee Out

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee delivers remarks to the Conservative Political Action Conference in February in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 8:08 am

Among the many contenders who could wind up becoming presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney's running mate, there are some potential surprises — like former presidential candidate-turned TV and radio host Mike Huckabee.

Putting Huckabee on the GOP ticket could certainly liven up the presidential race. In addition to being a respected former governor of Arkansas, he's well known for his good-natured public persona. At a Huckabee campaign event, you might find him playing an electric bass with the old-time rock 'n' roll band Capitol Offense.

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Music News
3:21 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Making A Home For John Coltrane's Legacy

Last year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation put the Coltrane Home on a list of the 11 most endangered historic sites in the United States. Now, a group of fans and family has set out to restore it.
Courtesy of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 4:12 pm

In 1964, John Coltrane moved from Queens, N.Y., to a brick ranch house on a 31/2 acre wooded lot in the quiet suburb of Dix Hills. This bucolic setting — 40 miles east of the city — is perhaps the last place you'd expect to find a musician creating the virtuosic jazz that Coltrane is famous for.

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Author Interviews
3:19 am
Sun July 22, 2012

New Edition Includes 39 Different Farewells To 'Arms'

Sean Hemingway, grandson of the famous novelist, authored an introduction to the new edition of Ernest Hemingway's classic A Farewell to Arms.
Bruce Schwarz Simon and Schuster

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Ernest Hemingway began his second novel, A Farewell to Arms, in 1928. He says, in an introduction to a later edition, that while he was writing the first draft his second son was born, and while he was rewriting the book, his father committed suicide. He goes on to say, with his famous economy, "I was not quite thirty years old when I finished the book and the day it was published was the day the stock market crashed."

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Author Interviews
3:17 am
Sun July 22, 2012

An 'Unlikely Pilgrimage' Toward Happiness

Before her debut novel, Rachel Joyce acted in London's Royal Shakespeare Company, and wrote more than 20 plays for BBC Radio 4.
Fatimah Namdar

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Rachel Joyce's novel The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry is about a man who very suddenly, with no warning or planning, sets off on a pilgrimage from the very southernmost part of England to the very northernmost part. It's a old-fashioned pilgrimage: He walks all the way, talking to the people he meets, on his way to the bedside of his old friend Queenie, who is dying.

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Music Interviews
3:17 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Aboriginal Sounds On Vermont Streets

Michael "Tree" Sampson plays the didgeridoo on the streets of Burlington, Vt.
Kirk Carapezza for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:54 pm

Vermont: Land of maple syrup, ski slopes, covered bridges and snow-capped mountains. Few people would associate the Green Mountain State with the didgeridoo, a wind instrument native to Australia. Until they've heard Michael "Tree" Sampson, that is.

Sampson's a one-man band who performs daily on Church Street in downtown Burlington.

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World
3:16 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Spain's Olympic Basketball Team Takes Aim At U.S.

Spanish star Pau Gasol shoots over France's Ronny Turiaf during a pre-Olympic game earlier this month. Gasol, who regularly plays for the Los Angeles Lakers, was Spain's leading scorer in the 2008 Olympics, when the team won a silver medal. The Spaniards may have the best chance of upsetting the favored U.S. team at the London Olympics.
Kenzo Tribouillard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Spain is a country that partied for days after winning the European Soccer Championships earlier this month.

Soccer dominates the sports scene, and the Spanish side is favored to win Olympic gold in London this summer. But Spain is also a basketball powerhouse and is currently ranked No. 2 in the world behind the U.S.

At a school gym, you'll find Spaniards who actually know that. Basketball is growing in popularity among kids, especially girls.

"Basketball is a sport that's beautiful for me," says 13-year-old Lucia Gutierrez.

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Sunday Puzzle
9:03 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

This Puzzle Is One For The PROs

Originally published on Sat August 4, 2012 11:21 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word starts with "P" and the second word starts with "RO." For example: For the clue, "A moving part of an automobile engine," the answer would be a "piston rod."

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The Two-Way
7:39 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Response To Disastrous Flood Ignites Russian Rage Online

An Emergency Ministry soldier helps to repair religious icons in a church hit by flood water in the town of Nizhnebakansky, about 750 miles south of Moscow, on Tuesday.
Sergey Ponomarev AP

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 9:54 am

Russians are slowly beginning to recover from the devastating flooding that soaked the southwestern region of Krasnodar. The floods, which struck in the early morning hours on July 7, reportedly killed more than 150 people.

It wasn't long before outrage flowed. Masha Lipman, a researcher with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Moscow, says the government had advance notice of the disaster, but didn't pass along the message.

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Music News
4:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Bob Dylan's Famous Electric Guitar: Lost But Found?

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 11:41 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The year was 1965. The place: Newport, Rhode Island. A young Bob Dylan took the stage at the Newport Folk Festival; a harmonica around his neck, and a guitar over his shoulder. But this time, something new - a wailing Stratocaster guitar. In 1965, folk music was acoustic music, period. And the crowd? Not happy that Bobby was plugged in.

(SOUNDBITE OF BOOING)

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Arts & Life
4:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Comic-Con Gives Fans A Glimpse At Creative Process

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 8:11 am

Guest host David Greene takes a tour of the largest comic book convention, the giant Comic-Con in Los Angeles.

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