Weekend Edition Sunday on NPR & Classical Music

Sunday from 6-10 AM
Hosted by: Audie Cornish

Whether revealing events in small-town America or overseas, or profiling notable personalities, Weekend Edition from Northwest Public Radio & NPR News appreciates the extraordinary details that make up every story. Join Bruce Bradberry and other Northwest Public Radio hosts for this two-hour weekend morning newsmagazine covering hard news, a wide variety of newsmakers, and cultural stories with care, accuracy, and a wink of humor.

Weekend Edition Sunday combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. Conceived as a cross between a Sunday newspaper and CBS' Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The highlight for many listeners is the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times.

With Bruce Bradberry at Northwest Public Radio  Visit Weekend Edition Sunday at NPR.org

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NPR Story
11:30 am
Sun July 22, 2012

'JoePa' Statue Removed; Penn State Faces Sanctions

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

The statue of Joe Paterno no longer stands outside Penn State Football Stadium.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOTOR RUNNING)

WERTHEIMER: The university announced early this morning that it would take the monument down in the wake of an investigative report that found the late coach had concealed sex abuse claims against one of his assistants, Jerry Sandusky.

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Monkey See
8:03 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Not Funny Enough? 'New Yorker' Gives 'Seinfeld' Cartoon A Second Chance

"I wish I was taller," was Elaine's caption in the 1998 episode of Seinfeld. Can it get funnier than that? You can try over on The New Yorker's Caption Contest page.
Courtesy The New Yorker

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

In its final season, the TV sitcom Seinfeld did a send-up of the cartoons in The New Yorker. The magazine's comics are distinctive – short, quippy, topical, understated. Simply put, they're smart.

Maybe too smart, sometimes, and that's what the character Elaine found when she got her own cartoon published in the magazine.

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Shift To Healing: Rush After Colo. Shooting Slows

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer. President Obama will go to Aurora, Colorado later today to visit the victims of Friday's movie theater shooting. Local and federal authorities spent Saturday using explosives and robots to disarm a series of booby traps they found in 24-year-old suspect James Holmes' apartment. Aurora police chief Dan Oates talked about how Holmes may have acquired those devices.

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

From List Of Names In Colo., A Mini Portrait Of Lives

Saturday, the Arapahoe County Coroner's Office released the names of the people who died in the shooting in an Aurora, Colo., movie theater.

NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Houses Of Worship Offer Havens For Some In Aurora

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

As the Colorado community of Aurora confronts what happened early on Friday morning and tries to come to terms with their friends and neighbors dying in a movie theater, one obvious place to turn it to religious leaders. Hundreds of people have attended vigils held by Aurora's religious leaders, and today many of those congregations are on their way to church. Mitch Hamilton is a pastor at Mississippi Avenue Baptist Church in Aurora, Colorado. Brother Hamilton, thank you for doing this.

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Candidates Battle For The Veterans' Vote

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

In A Static Race, Campaigns On Hold After Shooting

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

After Friday's deadly shootings there were quick responses from both President Obama and Republican candidate Mitt Romney. And an old debate over gun restrictions was reignited.

For more on that, and all the politics of the week, we turn to NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hi, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hi, Linda.

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

How AIDS Care Became The Way It Is

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Few people have a greater understanding of the history of HIV-AIDS and the evolution of treatment and patient care than Dr. Paul Volberding. He co-founded one of the first AIDS-designated clinics in the early 1980s at San Francisco General Hospital. And he is also the co-editor of the most widely used textbook of HIV medicine. Dr. Volberding is now a professor and co-director of the Center for AIDS Research at University of California, San Francisco. And he is here in Washington for the International AIDS Conference.

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

What Is Novelist Mark Haddon Reading?

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

From one man's extraordinary journey to another's extraordinary year. This summer, we've been asked friends of the show - authors, musicians, people passing through - what they're reading.

MARK HADDON: "1599" by James Shapiro.

WERTHEIMER: And novelist Mark Haddon is reading a book about the most famous poet in the English language.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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The Two-Way
3:56 am
Sun July 22, 2012

'Who's On First?' The Sign Language Version

A screen grab from the MLB video, "Costas and Seinfeld on Network."
MLB

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Abbott and Costello's famous "Who's on First?" routine still stands as one of the greatest comedy sketches of all time. It was a feat of rapid-fire dialogue, flawless comedic timing and devastating wit.

But could you do it without saying a word?

The answer appears to be yes. After Jerry Seinfeld broke down the classic skit on the MLB Network recently, NPR's Mike Pesca wound up with a peculiar email in his inbox.

It was a link to an American Sign Language (ASL) version of the skit, sent by a friend. It was amazing, Pesca says.

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