Weekend Edition Sunday on NPR & Classical Music

Sunday from 6-10 AM
Hosted by: Audie Cornish

Whether revealing events in small-town America or overseas, or profiling notable personalities, Weekend Edition from Northwest Public Radio & NPR News appreciates the extraordinary details that make up every story. Join Bruce Bradberry and other Northwest Public Radio hosts for this two-hour weekend morning newsmagazine covering hard news, a wide variety of newsmakers, and cultural stories with care, accuracy, and a wink of humor.

Weekend Edition Sunday combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. Conceived as a cross between a Sunday newspaper and CBS' Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The highlight for many listeners is the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times.

With Bruce Bradberry at Northwest Public Radio  Visit Weekend Edition Sunday at NPR.org

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Houses Of Worship Offer Havens For Some In Aurora

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

As the Colorado community of Aurora confronts what happened early on Friday morning and tries to come to terms with their friends and neighbors dying in a movie theater, one obvious place to turn it to religious leaders. Hundreds of people have attended vigils held by Aurora's religious leaders, and today many of those congregations are on their way to church. Mitch Hamilton is a pastor at Mississippi Avenue Baptist Church in Aurora, Colorado. Brother Hamilton, thank you for doing this.

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Candidates Battle For The Veterans' Vote

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

In A Static Race, Campaigns On Hold After Shooting

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

After Friday's deadly shootings there were quick responses from both President Obama and Republican candidate Mitt Romney. And an old debate over gun restrictions was reignited.

For more on that, and all the politics of the week, we turn to NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hi, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hi, Linda.

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NPR Story
4:37 am
Sun July 22, 2012

How AIDS Care Became The Way It Is

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Few people have a greater understanding of the history of HIV-AIDS and the evolution of treatment and patient care than Dr. Paul Volberding. He co-founded one of the first AIDS-designated clinics in the early 1980s at San Francisco General Hospital. And he is also the co-editor of the most widely used textbook of HIV medicine. Dr. Volberding is now a professor and co-director of the Center for AIDS Research at University of California, San Francisco. And he is here in Washington for the International AIDS Conference.

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The Two-Way
3:56 am
Sun July 22, 2012

'Who's On First?' The Sign Language Version

A screen grab from the MLB video, "Costas and Seinfeld on Network."
MLB

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Abbott and Costello's famous "Who's on First?" routine still stands as one of the greatest comedy sketches of all time. It was a feat of rapid-fire dialogue, flawless comedic timing and devastating wit.

But could you do it without saying a word?

The answer appears to be yes. After Jerry Seinfeld broke down the classic skit on the MLB Network recently, NPR's Mike Pesca wound up with a peculiar email in his inbox.

It was a link to an American Sign Language (ASL) version of the skit, sent by a friend. It was amazing, Pesca says.

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Election 2012
3:29 am
Sun July 22, 2012

He's A Long Shot, But Don't Count Huckabee Out

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee delivers remarks to the Conservative Political Action Conference in February in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 8:08 am

Among the many contenders who could wind up becoming presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney's running mate, there are some potential surprises — like former presidential candidate-turned TV and radio host Mike Huckabee.

Putting Huckabee on the GOP ticket could certainly liven up the presidential race. In addition to being a respected former governor of Arkansas, he's well known for his good-natured public persona. At a Huckabee campaign event, you might find him playing an electric bass with the old-time rock 'n' roll band Capitol Offense.

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Music News
3:21 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Making A Home For John Coltrane's Legacy

Last year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation put the Coltrane Home on a list of the 11 most endangered historic sites in the United States. Now, a group of fans and family has set out to restore it.
Courtesy of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 4:12 pm

In 1964, John Coltrane moved from Queens, N.Y., to a brick ranch house on a 31/2 acre wooded lot in the quiet suburb of Dix Hills. This bucolic setting — 40 miles east of the city — is perhaps the last place you'd expect to find a musician creating the virtuosic jazz that Coltrane is famous for.

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Author Interviews
3:19 am
Sun July 22, 2012

New Edition Includes 39 Different Farewells To 'Arms'

Sean Hemingway, grandson of the famous novelist, authored an introduction to the new edition of Ernest Hemingway's classic A Farewell to Arms.
Bruce Schwarz Simon and Schuster

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Ernest Hemingway began his second novel, A Farewell to Arms, in 1928. He says, in an introduction to a later edition, that while he was writing the first draft his second son was born, and while he was rewriting the book, his father committed suicide. He goes on to say, with his famous economy, "I was not quite thirty years old when I finished the book and the day it was published was the day the stock market crashed."

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Author Interviews
3:17 am
Sun July 22, 2012

An 'Unlikely Pilgrimage' Toward Happiness

Before her debut novel, Rachel Joyce acted in London's Royal Shakespeare Company, and wrote more than 20 plays for BBC Radio 4.
Fatimah Namdar

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 11:43 am

Rachel Joyce's novel The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry is about a man who very suddenly, with no warning or planning, sets off on a pilgrimage from the very southernmost part of England to the very northernmost part. It's a old-fashioned pilgrimage: He walks all the way, talking to the people he meets, on his way to the bedside of his old friend Queenie, who is dying.

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Music Interviews
3:17 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Aboriginal Sounds On Vermont Streets

Michael "Tree" Sampson plays the didgeridoo on the streets of Burlington, Vt.
Kirk Carapezza for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:54 pm

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