Weekend Edition Sunday on NPR & Classical Music

Sunday from 6-10 AM
Hosted by: Audie Cornish

Whether revealing events in small-town America or overseas, or profiling notable personalities, Weekend Edition from Northwest Public Radio & NPR News appreciates the extraordinary details that make up every story. Join Bruce Bradberry and other Northwest Public Radio hosts for this two-hour weekend morning newsmagazine covering hard news, a wide variety of newsmakers, and cultural stories with care, accuracy, and a wink of humor.

Weekend Edition Sunday combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. Conceived as a cross between a Sunday newspaper and CBS' Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The highlight for many listeners is the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times.

With Bruce Bradberry at Northwest Public Radio  Visit Weekend Edition Sunday at NPR.org

Composer ID: 
5187c775e1c8c870fd6da016|5187c750e1c8c870fd6d9fbc

Pages

Around the Nation
2:36 am
Sun September 23, 2012

For Myanmar Activist, A Welcome 40 Years In Waiting

Burmese opposition politician Aung San Suu Kyi is presented with a U.S. Congressional Gold Medal at a ceremony at the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday in Washington, D.C.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 23, 2012 9:43 am

Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi has made a remarkable transition from a detained human rights dissident to a member of Myanmar's parliament.

In her first trip to the U.S. in 40 years, Suu Kyi talked a lot about how she's learning to compromise with the former military men who kept her under house arrest for years.

Read more
Music Interviews
11:03 pm
Sat September 22, 2012

Mumford & Sons: Finding Balance In 'Babel'

Mumford & Sons.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun September 23, 2012 9:43 am

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
9:03 pm
Sat September 22, 2012

Finding Consecutively Good TV Shows

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sat October 6, 2012 7:46 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is the name of a TV show, past or present. Each can be found in consecutive letters in the sentences read. Name the TV shows. For example, in the sentence, "We watched the acrobat many times," the hidden TV show is BATMAN. Hint: Each answer has at least six letters.

Read more
Middle East
5:00 pm
Sat September 22, 2012

Gaza's Future Looks Bleaker Even Than Its Past

A Palestinian family rides on a donkey cart along a waste dump in Al-Nusirat, central Gaza Strip, in February. Living conditions continue to deteriorate for the 1.8 million Palestinians who reside in Gaza.
Ali Ali EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 8:43 am

Ihab Abu Nada's family lives down a series of dark narrow alleyways in Gaza City. The house has two bedrooms for the seven people living there — the kitchen and the bathroom are in the same space, and the roof is made of tin and frequently leaks.

Still, most of the Palestinian family's income goes into paying the rent.

Ihab's picture adorns a cracked wall; it's a simple memorial. Earlier this month, after being unable to find work, the 18-year-old set himself on fire and died. The family is still in mourning.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:16 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Four U.S. Troops Killed In Afghanistan; NATO Strike Kills 8 Afghan Women

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 3:56 am

Four U.S. service members were killed by an Afghan police officer and a NATO airstrike killed eight women in separate attacks in Afghanistan on Sunday.

Read more
Asia
4:35 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Chinese Flood Streets In Anti-Japan Demonstrations

Protester Mu Peidong carries a homemade sign that reads: "Even if we have to kill all Japanese, we must recover the Diaoyu islands."
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 7:48 am

It's been a weekend of huge anti-Japanese protests in as many as 85 cities across China, according to the Kyodo news agency.

Read more
Politics
4:35 am
Sun September 16, 2012

What To Watch For In Race For Hispanic Vote

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

With about 50 days to go before Election Day, both parties are focusing on what will lead them to victory in both the battle for the White House, as well as control in Congress. What everyone seems to agree upon is that the Latino vote will be crucial. Between 2000 and 2010, the Hispanic population in the U.S. increased by some 43 percent. Latino voters can mean the difference in several states.

Read more
Sports
4:35 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Reading The Baseball Tea Leaves

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's time to talk sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALL GAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: Life is a ball game being played each day. Life is a ball game...

WERTHEIMER: It's mid-September and for fans of Major League Baseball that means only a couple of weeks are left before playoffs get underway.

But before the games begin, NPR's Mike Pesca has been stacking up the baseball stats and he's here to share his findings. Hi, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: They're about to topple over just now.

(LAUGHTER)

Read more
History
4:35 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Reenacting Antietam: Fighting As Family Once Did

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Tomorrow marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's Battle of Antietam, one of the bloodiest days of any war. In honor of the sesquicentennial, the battle site is hosting a slew of events commemorating the fight. Reporter Jacob Fenston went to Sharpsburg, Maryland, the site of the battle, and brings us this report.

JACOB FENSTON, BYLINE: It started just before dawn.

(SOUNDBITE OF BUGLE PLAYING)

Read more
Around the Nation
4:35 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Homestead Act Sewed Its Way Into U.S. Fabric

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Of course, the Homestead Act was born during troubled times in American history. It passed during the Civil War, but just barely. And it came at the expense of Native Americans, who were displaced from lands they have settled for generation. We spoke to Jonathan Earle, an associate professor of history at the University of Kansas, and asked him why the Homestead Act was so difficult to pass.

Read more

Pages