Weekend Edition Sunday on NPR & Classical Music

Sunday from 6-10 AM
Hosted by: Audie Cornish

Whether revealing events in small-town America or overseas, or profiling notable personalities, Weekend Edition from Northwest Public Radio & NPR News appreciates the extraordinary details that make up every story. Join Bruce Bradberry and other Northwest Public Radio hosts for this two-hour weekend morning newsmagazine covering hard news, a wide variety of newsmakers, and cultural stories with care, accuracy, and a wink of humor.

Weekend Edition Sunday combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. Conceived as a cross between a Sunday newspaper and CBS' Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The highlight for many listeners is the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times.

With Bruce Bradberry at Northwest Public Radio  Visit Weekend Edition Sunday at NPR.org

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It's All Politics
12:20 am
Sun December 2, 2012

The 3 Unofficial GOP Rules That Are Making A Deficit Deal Even Harder

House Speaker John Boehner takes questions during a news conference Friday on Capitol Hill.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 2, 2012 4:40 pm

Making an already head-splittingly difficult deal on the fiscal cliff even harder to resolve is a set of three rules by which the Republicans who run the House play.

These are not official regulations; they're more shibboleths that House GOP leaders have adopted in recent years. And those rules are leaving House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, little room to maneuver as lawmakers try to avoid a set of tax increases and spending cuts set to take effect at the end of the year.

1. "The majority of the majority"

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Europe
12:09 am
Sun December 2, 2012

Ach! No End In Sight For Berlin Airport Woes

The opening date of Germany's new Willy Brandt Berlin Brandenburg International Airport has been delayed three times due to construction delays and safety concerns.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 2, 2012 4:54 am

Germans are famous for their efficiency and being on time. But a much-delayed, expensive new airport in the German capital, Berlin, is rapidly destroying that reputation.

Located in the former East Berlin neighborhood of Schoenefeld, the new airport is to replace three others that serviced passengers in the once-divided city. One of those, Tempelhof — made famous by the Allied airlifts of food and supplies during the Soviet blockade of the late 1940s — is already closed.

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Sunday Puzzle
11:53 pm
Sat December 1, 2012

Untangle An 'Act Of God'

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun December 2, 2012 6:42 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar three-word phrase in the form "____ of ____." The letters in the first and last words of each phrase are rearranged. You give the phrases. For example, "Cat of Dog" becomes "Act of God."

Last week's challenge from listener Henry Hook of Brooklyn, N.Y.: In a few weeks something will happen that hasn't happened since 1987. What is it?

Answer: A year with no repeat digits (1987, 2013)

Winner: Darren Dunham of Santa Clara, Calif.

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Music Interviews
10:33 pm
Sat December 1, 2012

Elizabeth LaPrelle: Carrying On The Appalachian Tradition

Elizabeth LaPrelle sings during The Floyd Radio Show, a monthly program streamed live online.
Woody Crenshaw Courtesy of the Floyd Country Store

Originally published on Sun December 2, 2012 7:12 am

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Middle East
4:33 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Bullet Dodged In Turkey, But Kurdish Conflict Lingers

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
4:33 am
Sun November 25, 2012

The Fiscal Cliff Isn't The Only Item On Congress' List

Congress returns to work this week after taking most of the autumn off to campaign. Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Washington editor, Ron Elving, about the long congressional to-do list during the so-called "lame-duck" session.

Sports
4:33 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Basketball Golden Boy May Be Playing His Own Sport

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALL GAME")

SISTER WYNONA CARR: (Singing) Life is a ball game being played each day...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's Sunday morning, so that means NPR's Mike Pesca is with us for our weekly chat about sports - and frankly, whatever else strikes our fancy. He's up in New York. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hey. Maybe woodworking.

MARTIN: Who knows?

PESCA: Scrapbooking.

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Author Interviews
4:33 am
Sun November 25, 2012

'The Missing Ink' And The Intimacy Of Writing

When Philip Hensher realized he didn't know what his best friend's handwriting looked like, he decided to write a book. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Hensher about that book, The Missing Ink: The Lost Art of Handwriting.

NWPR Books
3:11 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Old Newspapers, New Perspectives On The American Revolution

Courtesy of Sourcebooks

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 4:33 am

Time has a way of condensing major historical events into a few key moments, with one-dimensional, legendary figures at the forefront. In his new book, author and archivist Todd Andrlik gives life and depth to one such event — the American Revolution. He uses newspaper reporting from that era to provide a sense of the Revolution as it actually unfolded.

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Around the Nation
3:04 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Awash With Love: Storm Resurfaces 1940s Letters

Kathleen Chaney and her son Patrick found the storm-soaked stack of letters as they were walking along the New Jersey shore.
Lindsay Lazarski Newsworks.org

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 9:15 pm

The weekend after Superstorm Sandy, Kathleen Chaney and her son Patrick stumbled upon a bundle of letters while they were walking along the New Jersey shore near her home.

The letters were tied with a pink ribbon and thoroughly soaked. Some of the beautiful handwriting had blurred. Chaney took the bundle home, dried out the letters and began to read them.

They were written to a man named Lynn Farnham, signed by "your loving Dot." Chaney says the letters speak of true love and devotion.

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