Weekend Edition Sunday on NPR & Classical Music

Sunday from 6-10 AM
Hosted by: Audie Cornish

Whether revealing events in small-town America or overseas, or profiling notable personalities, Weekend Edition from Northwest Public Radio & NPR News appreciates the extraordinary details that make up every story. Join Bruce Bradberry and other Northwest Public Radio hosts for this two-hour weekend morning newsmagazine covering hard news, a wide variety of newsmakers, and cultural stories with care, accuracy, and a wink of humor.

Weekend Edition Sunday combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. Conceived as a cross between a Sunday newspaper and CBS' Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The highlight for many listeners is the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times.

With Bruce Bradberry at Northwest Public Radio  Visit Weekend Edition Sunday at NPR.org

Composer ID: 
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Poetry
11:14 am
Sun October 14, 2012

'A Thousand Mornings' With Poet Mary Oliver

Mary Oliver has won a Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award.
Rachel Giese Brown

Mary Oliver is a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet whose body of work is largely filled with imagery of the natural world — cats, opossums crossing the street, sunflowers and black oaks in the sunshine. Her most recent collection is entitled A Thousand Mornings.

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Science
4:17 am
Sun October 14, 2012

A Human-Powered Helicopter: Straight Up Difficult

Kyle Glusenkamp pilots Gamera, a human-powered helicopter.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 7:00 am

"I grew up wanting to fly," says Graham Bowen-Davies. "I guess I just settled for being an engineer."

He's standing on an indoor track in southern Maryland, watching a giant helicopter take flight. At the end of each of its four spindly arms — arms he helped design and build — a giant rotor churns the air. In the cockpit sits the engine: a 0.7-horsepower, 135-pound graduate student named Kyle Gluesenkamp.

Gluesenkamp is pedaling like crazy to keep the rotors spinning and the craft aloft.

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NPR Story
3:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Hard Life Of Pullman Porters Gets Stage Debut

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 11:14 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For most of the 20th century, if you wanted to travel in style you were traveling on trains. If you really wanted to do it up right, you shelled out big money for a private berth in something called a Pullman car. Thousands of African-American men found steady work as Pullman porters, but they also faced low wages, terrible working conditions and racism.

Seattle-based playwright Cheryl West tells their story in "Pullman Porter Blues." It's a musical drama premiering at the Seattle Repertory Theatre.

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NPR Story
3:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

What Recent Gains Mean For U.S. Economy

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 11:14 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Week In Sports: Big Surprises In Baseball Playoffs

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 11:14 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALL GAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: Life is a ball game being played each day. Life is a ball game...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Baseball playoffs moved into the league championships last night and the New York Yankees suffered a 6-4 loss. Yankees captain Derek Jeter suffered a broken ankle. NPR's Mike Pesca hasn't missed a minute of the postseason drama. He joins us now. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: There have been a lot of games. I think I'll cop to missing a couple of minutes but yeah, yeah.

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History
3:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Lessons From The Cuban Missile Crisis

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 11:14 am

Fifty years ago, a United States Air Force U-2 spyplane captured photographic proof that the Soviet Union was installing offensive nuclear missile sites in Cuba, and a diplomatic standoff ensued. Weekend Edition host Rachel Martin talks with Graham Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and professor at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government about the lessons learned from the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Sunday Puzzle
1:32 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Where, 'O' Where Shall I Put You?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 11:14 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a two-word phrase in which the letter "O" is added at the end of the first word to make the second word. For example, given the clue "pack animal owned by Thomas Jefferson's first vice president," the answer would be "Burr burro."

Last week's challenge: Draw a regular hexagon and connect every pair of vertices except one. The pair you don't connect are not on opposite sides of the hexagon but along a shorter diagonal. How many triangles of any size are in this figure?

Answer: 82 triangles

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Alt.Latino
11:03 pm
Sat October 13, 2012

What Two Songs Say About Argentine History

Argentine band Tremor adds a new twist to a traditional dance music known as malambo.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:19 am

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NPR Story
8:24 am
Sun October 7, 2012

The Barcode: Through Thick And Thin For 60 Years

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 10:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Today marks an important anniversary. On October 7, 1952, 60 years ago, the patent for the bar code was filed. For younger listeners, it's perhaps hard to imagine that there was actually a time when everything you bought wasn't scanable. Today, of course, those vertical zebra stripes are ubiquitous, on everything - from air fresheners to zombie survival kits.

According to the BBC, the very first item ever scanned by its barcode was a pack of chewing gum in an Ohio supermarket in 1974.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

National Security
4:55 am
Sun October 7, 2012

After Years-Long Battles, Terrorism Suspects In U.S.

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 10:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Prosecutors are calling it a milestone for the U.S. justice system. A radical Islamic cleric and four other of America's most wanted terrorism suspects have finally appeared in courts in New York and Connecticut. Authorities had fought for years to extradite the men from the United Kingdom. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

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