Talk of the Nation

Mon. - Thurs. from 11am to 1pm (not including Science Friday)
Hosted by: Neal Conan

Talk of the Nation® links the headlines with what's on people's minds, providing a springboard for listeners and experts to exchange ideas and pose critical questions about major events in the news and the world around them. Each day, Talk of the Nation combines the award-winning resources of NPR News with the vital participation of listeners. The result is a spirited and productive exchange of knowledge and insight that delves deeply into the news and ideas of the day.

Monday through Thursday, host Neal Conan invites callers to discuss areas of topical interest, including politics and public service, education, religion, music, and healthcare. Talk of the Nation goes behind the headlines with decision-makers, authors, thinkers, artists, and listeners around the world, who become part of the conversation by calling 1-800-989-TALK.

Talk of the Nation won the prestigious Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Silver Baton Award in 1994-95 for "The Changing of the Guard: The Republican Revolution," as well as the 1993-94 duPont-Columbia Silver Baton for part of NPR's coverage of the South African elections. The program also won the 1993 Corporation for Public Broadcasting Silver Award.

Below, you will find articles, transcripts, and clips of many of the stories heard on Talk of the Nation.

Visit Talk of the Nation on NPR.org

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NPR Story
10:28 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Voyager 1 Bids Farewell to the Solar System

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 2:49 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Thirty-five years ago, NASA launched a pair of spacecraft called Voyager 1 and 2 in hopes of learning more about the outer planets of solar system, those big gas giants. The Voyagers beamed back dazzling close-ups of the big red spot on Jupiter and the rings of Saturn, but scientists wanted to see even more of what's out there, see how far the Voyagers could go before running out of fuel.

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NPR Story
10:28 am
Fri June 22, 2012

More To The Universe Than Meets The Eye

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 2:49 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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NPR Story
10:28 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Tall Buildings, A Cut Above The Rest

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 2:49 pm

A pair of Canadian skyscrapers have been dubbed the "Marilyn Monroe" towers due to their shapely form. In Abu Dhabi, twin towers are shielded from the sun by computer-controlled shading screens. Architect Antony Wood discusses features of some tall buildings that make them standouts across the world.

Law
11:32 am
Thu June 21, 2012

Why Operation Fast And Furious Failed

The operation was run by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives in 2009-10. NPR's Ted Robbins and Michel Marizco of the Fronteras Desk talk about the intent of Fast and Furious, why the operation failed, and solutions to curb gun-running on the U.S.-Mexican border.

Race
11:01 am
Thu June 21, 2012

Betwixt And Between: Studying Multiracial Identity

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 11:34 am

In 1989, Reginald Daniel began teaching a university course on multiracial identity called Betwixt and Between. It remains the longest-running college course addressing the multiracial experience. For his continuing studies and research on multiraciality, Daniel received the Loving Prize.

Law
11:01 am
Thu June 21, 2012

The Grim Realities Of Life In Supermax Prisons

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 11:24 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Over the past 25 years, the number and percentage of prisoners held in isolation has exploded at both state and federal penitentiaries. At a Senate subcommittee hearing this, Senator Richard Durbin argued that the dramatic expansion of the use of solitary confinement is a human rights issue we can't ignore.

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Movie Interviews
11:01 am
Thu June 21, 2012

'Call Me Kuchu': Uganda's Secret Gay Community

One of the front page stories published by Ugandan newspaper The Rolling Stone, which terrorized the LGBT community.
Katherine Fairfax Wright Courtesy of 'Call Me Kuchu'

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 11:29 am

When Ugandan lawmakers introduced an anti-homosexuality bill in 2009, it called for the death penalty for "serial offenders." That legislation failed, but a new version was reintroduced in 2012 in an effort to further criminalize same-sex relations in a country where homosexuality is already illegal. The bills have drawn loud and widespread condemnation from much of the international community, particularly after the brutal death of openly gay activist Davdi Kato.

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Movie Interviews
11:32 am
Wed June 20, 2012

'Revisionaries' Tells Story Of Texas Textbook Battle

Don McLeroy has served on the Texas State Board of Education for more than a decade.
Silver Lining Film Group

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 6:39 am

Controversy erupted in 2009 when the Texas State Board of Education debated changes to the state's textbooks that centered on the teaching of evolution.

The Revisionaries documents the Board of Education's contentious battle, focusing in large part on Don McLeroy — a young-earth creationist and, at the time, chairman of the Texas Board of Education. The film is being screend at the American Film Institute's Silverdocs Film Festival.

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Wed June 20, 2012

Obama's Shift On Immigration And The Latino Vote

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 1:22 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Forty years after Watergate, President Obama cites executive privilege. Rubio's out that he's in again, and after baseball phenom Bryce Harper leads off, Harry Reid hits second. It's Wednesday and time for a...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: That's a clown question, bro...

CONAN: Edition of the Political Junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Wed June 20, 2012

What's Ahead For Iran After 'Last Chance' Talks

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 12:20 pm

The latest round of high-level negotiations over Iran's nuclear ambitions ended Tuesday without an agreement. After the failure of talks that President Obama called Iran's "last chance," some wonder whether or not Israel or the United States may now opt for military force.

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