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Sueann Ramella

Sueann Ramella, Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne help you wake up informed and up-to-date, on our flagship news show, Morning Edition. NPR's weekday morning newsmagazine includes coverage of breaking national and international stories, as well as thoughtful ideas and commentary, arts and culture reviews, and notes on human interest. Throughout the morning, Sueann also brings you regional news and weather to help you plan your day.

Below, you will find articles, transcripts, and clips of many of the stories heard on today's Morning Edition.

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The Salt
12:27 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Laws That Target Homeless Imperil Programs That Feed Them Outdoors

Volunteers distribute food outside a Philadelphia Department of Public Health hearing in March on rules banning outdoor food distribution.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 6:20 pm

A growing number of cities want to tackle the problem of homelessness by outlawing what are known as "acts of daily living" — sleeping, eating and panhandling in public. In Philadelphia, a new rule is targeting not the homeless but those who feed them.

When Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter announced the ban on serving food in public parks last March, he said moving such services indoors was part of an effort to raise standards for the homeless.

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Research News
12:25 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Dead Reefs Can Come Back To Life, Study Says

Coral polyps feed in the plankton-rich waters by Santa Catalina, Panama. A new study of coral reefs off the Pacific coast of Panama shows that dead coral reefs may be able to recover from rising ocean temperatures and other environmental disasters.
laszlo-photo Flickr

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 9:10 am

Coral reefs may be able to recover from disaster, according to a study that provides a bit of reassurance about the future of these endangered ecosystems.

Coral reefs around the world are at risk as the ocean's temperature continues to rise. Those trends could kill not only coral but also the fish and other species that depend on the reefs. Those reefs are important for people as well.

'Shocking' Reef History

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StoryCorps
12:25 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Sending Vets' Lost Medals, And Memories, Home

Capt. Zachariah Fike helped reunite sisters Adeline Rockko (left) and Mary Piccoli with the Purple Heart medal of their late brother, Army Pvt. Corrado Piccoli.
Courtesy of Zachariah Fike

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 8:38 am

Zachariah Fike has an unusual hobby. The Vermont Army National Guard captain finds old military medals for sale in antique stores and on the Internet. But unlike most memorabilia collectors, Zac doesn't keep the medals for himself.

Instead, he tracks down the medals' rightful owners, and returns them.

His effort to reunite families with lost medals all began with a Christmas gift from his mother — a Purple Heart, found in an antique shop and engraved with the name Corrado A.G. Piccoli.

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Business
12:02 am
Fri July 6, 2012

For Some Businesses, Daily Deals Have A Dark Side

Creative Hands is a therapy center in Washington, D.C., that used daily deals when it opened last year. Instead of bolstering revenue, the deals left Creative Hands' owner in the red.
Ebony Bailey NPR

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 6:20 pm

Groupon and Living Social have sold tens of millions of daily deals and are now a major force in retail. But they rely heavily on getting businesses to offer their goods and services at deep discounts. In exchange, businesses hope for payoff in the form of return customers.

Sometimes, though, the flood of extra business causes more problems than it solves.

Deal-Hungry Crowd

Ailie Ham had just opened Creative Hands Massage in Washington, D.C., when she decided to offer deals through Living Social and Groupon last year.

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Around the Nation
3:53 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Tweeted Picture Helps Owner Find Lost Dog

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 7:25 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Twitter is going to the dogs. Yesterday, Patch, a Jack Russell terrier, boarded a train near Dublin. When the train staff discovered him, they posted his picture on Twitter. It was re-tweeted more than 500 times. Within a half hour, his owner saw the photo and tweeted: That's my dog. Then she opened a Twitter account for Patch, in case he should go missing again. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Around the Nation
3:42 am
Thu July 5, 2012

VA Hospital Recuits Mental Health Providers

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 7:25 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The Department of Veterans Affairs is adding staff to its hospitals to meet the mental health needs of vets of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. As Erin Toner of WUWM in Milwaukee reports, some clinicians say the help cannot come soon enough.

ERIN TONER, BYLINE: The VA hospital in Milwaukee is a hectic place. On most mornings you have to circle the parking lots over and over to find a spot. Luckily there's valet service if patients would rather leave the parking to someone else.

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Around the Nation
3:42 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Proud Dad Ordered To Take Down Huge Sign

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 7:25 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR Story
1:46 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 7:25 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the back story on VIP loans.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: A former mortgage company, Countrywide, used a VIP loan program to buy influence with members of Congress, staffers and other officials, including a number at Fannie Mae, the government backed mortgage giant central to Countrywide's business. That the bottom line of a new report out today from the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:46 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Power Outages Darken Many July 4 Celebrations

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 7:25 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On the day after the Fourth, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

It was especially easy for some Americans to see the fireworks last night. They had no competing source of light.

INSKEEP: Brilliant displays lit up cities like New York and Washington, but across Maryland, Virginia and New Jersey, about a quarter of a million homes still have no electricity.

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NPR Story
1:46 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Romney: Obama's Health Mandate Is A Tax

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney walks with his wife, Ann, and other family members, along with Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte, in the Wolfeboro, N.H., Independence Day parade Wednesday. Ayotte has been mentioned as a possible vice presidential contender.
Kayana Szymczak Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 7:25 pm

Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney spent his July Fourth holiday marching in a New Hampshire parade, and backtracking statements a top adviser made about the individual mandate in the Obama health care law.

There was something for almost everybody in Wolfeboro's Independence Day parade: a local brass band, bonnet-wearing Daughters of the American Revolution, a Zumba instructor shimmying across the bed of a pickup truck, and even a Jimmy Durante impersonator, complete with prosthetic nose.

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