All Things Considered Weekend on NPR & Classical Music

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Hosted by: Guy Raz

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by almost 13 million people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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Around the Nation
2:36 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Once-Dilapidated City Train Stations Enjoying A Renaissance

Denver's Union Station, which was remodeled to include restaurants, stores and a hotel, reopened last month.
Gary C. Caskey UPI/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 8:49 am

With its new restaurants and stores, Denver's recently reopened Union Station is bustling now. But five years ago, it would have been empty.

"If you would have come down here on a Saturday, there would have been no one in here," says Walter Isenberg, who runs Sage Hospitality, one of the main architects of Union Station's resurgence. "It would have been this vacant, desolate hall. Ceilings were peeling, kind of in some major disrepair."

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Planet Money
2:05 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Should We Kill The $100 Bill?

Noel Celis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 3:35 pm

Of all the U.S. currency in the world, nearly 80 percent is in $100 bills. That's about a trillion dollars.

Some people want to get rid of the bill altogether. Ken Rogoff, an economist at Harvard University, says the $100 bill helps criminals:

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Parallels
1:32 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Gaza Students Wonder When Their Schools Will Reopen

Displaced Palestinian Emada Al Attar, 23, holds her 16 day-old baby boy Anous in a classroom where they sleep in a U.N. school where the family is taking refuge during the war, in Gaza City, Gaza Strip on Aug. 8.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 5:02 pm

There's clamor and hustle outside the Western Gaza City Educational Directorate. A month late, this year's graduating high school students are getting their high school diplomas.

Usually, there's a little ceremony. But today, they're just clustering around a window while the certificates are handed out. So many education workers are injured or have lost homes that only about a third of them showed up for work.

Nonetheless, the students' joy feels loud and luminous in a city numbed by war.

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Trade Lingo
1:31 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Electricians Aren't Magicians, But Their Rabbits Disappear, Too

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 3:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A soap maker...

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

A gemologist...

SIEGEL: ...A few motorcyclists...

BLOCK: ...A sail maker...

SIEGEL: ...Some baristas...

BLOCK: ...A couple of strippers...

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Africa
1:16 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Kenyan Health Workers Fear Ebola May Take Flight

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 3:35 pm

Kenya's international airport is on high alert, since the Kenya Medical Association has called on the national airline to suspend flights due to concerns over the Ebola outbreak. The airline has responded by pledging faith in its new screening procedures. The World Health Organization has labeled Kenya a "high risk" country for the spread of Ebola.

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Iraq
6:14 pm
Wed August 13, 2014

Hagel Says Rescue Mission At Iraq's Mt. Sinjar Is No Longer Needed

Originally published on Wed August 13, 2014 7:32 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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The Salt
3:32 pm
Wed August 13, 2014

Shifting Climate Has North Dakota Farmers Swapping Wheat For Corn

Dan Selvig says wetter conditions helped convince his family to shift their plantings to corn.
John Ydstie NPR

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 8:29 am

Overall, climate change is predicted to hurt agriculture around the world. It could even threaten corn production in the Corn Belt.

But in North Dakota conditions are now better for raising corn, and that's a big benefit for farmers.

When I was growing up in Wolford, N.D., up near the Canadian border, wheat was king. It had been the dominant crop since the prairie was first plowed in the late 1800s. So it was kind of strange to go back this summer and find Larry Slaubaugh, a local farmer, filling his 18-wheeler with corn from a huge steel grain bin.

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Business
2:23 pm
Wed August 13, 2014

City-Run Gas Station Makes Waves In Southeastern Kentucky

Bob Thomas fills up his pickup truck at the municipal-run gas station in Somerset, Ky. There are no candy bars, 44-ounce soft drinks or lottery tickets sold. The price of gas here is $3.36 a gallon, about 20 cents lower than the statewide average.
Emil Moffatt WKYU

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 4:41 pm

After years of complaints about high gas prices in Somerset, Ky., the city council and mayor did something about it. Last month, Somerset began selling gasoline to the public.

"It should have been this way years ago — fair," says Bob Thomas as he fills up his green pickup truck at the municipal Somerset Fuel Center.

The price is $3.36 a gallon, lower than the statewide average.

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Race
1:39 pm
Wed August 13, 2014

In Hashtag Protest, 'Black Twitter' Shows Its Strength

Originally published on Wed August 13, 2014 6:14 pm

Following the shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teen, many young African-Americans posted pictures of themselves on Twitter under the hashtag #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. They were protesting the damaging ways in which young black men like Brown are often portrayed in the media. The response demonstrated the scope of what's informally known as Black Twitter, a virtual community of African-American Twitter users.

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Education
1:36 pm
Wed August 13, 2014

Forget The Bake Sale: Some Of School's Funds Come From Bars And Brothels

Originally published on Wed August 13, 2014 6:14 pm

This month, schools across the U.S. are preparing for students to return to the classroom and looking for creative ways to supplement budgets. As Capital Public Radio's Ky Plaskon reports, one Nevada school district is turning to unlikely sources of funding: liquor and prostitution.

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