Sunday Puzzle
9:03 pm
Sat May 12, 2012

You Two, Move To The Back Of The Line

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 6:21 pm

On-Air Challenge: The word "mother" has a surprising property. If you move the first two letters to the end, you get "thermo," the prefix for "heat." Every answer today is another six-letter word that, when you move the first two letters to the end, you get another word or phrase.

Last Week's Challenge from listener Gary Witkin of Newark, Del.: Using only the six letters of the name "Bronte," repeating them as often as necessary, spell a familiar six-word phrase. What is it?

Answer: "To be or not to be"

Winner: Charlotte Sky of Pebble Beach, Calif.

Next Week's Challenge: Name a state capital. Change one of the vowels to another vowel and say the result phonetically. You will name a revered profession. What is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Are you ready? Take a deep breath, do some stretches and turn up the volume because it is time for the puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: And in case you forgot last week's challenge, here's a refresher from the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master Will Shortz.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Take the name Bronte, B-R-O-N-T-E. Use only these six letters but repeat them as often as necessary. Spell a familiar six-word phrase. What phrase is it?

MARTIN: Well, more than 3,400 of you figured out the answer. And our randomly selected winner this week is Charlotte Sky of Pebble Beach, California. Congratulations, Charlotte.

CHARLOTTE SKY: Thank you.

MARTIN: So, tell us what was the answer to last week's challenge.

SKY: The answer was: To be or not to be.

MARTIN: Lovely job. So, are you a big Shakespeare buff or did you use some kind of special strategy to figure this out?

SKY: Well, actually, I am a Shakespeare buff, and I usually, if I hear a word that I need to do something with, I put it in a circle and then sometimes the answers will come a little quicker.

MARTIN: There was also a Bronte sister who was named Charlotte, right?

SKY: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MARTIN: So, maybe you had a secret advantage. OK. Well, before we continue, let's welcome the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master Will Shortz. Good morning, Will.

SHORTZ: Good morning, Rachel. Happy Mother's Day. And congratulations, Charlotte.

SKY: Thank you.

MARTIN: OK. Charlotte, without further ado, are you ready to play the puzzle?

SKY: Oh, I think so.

MARTIN: Deep breath.

SKY: I'm glad you're there to help in case of brain freeze.

MARTIN: We will tackle it together. OK, Will. Bring it on.

SHORTZ: Yes. The word mother has a surprising property. If you move the first two letters to the end, you get thermo, which is the prefix for heat. Well, every answer today is another six-letter word that, when you move the first two letters to the end, you get another word or phrase.

MARTIN: OK. You got that, Charlotte?

SKY: I think so.

MARTIN: All right. Let's try it.

SHORTZ: Number one is join the armed forces. And the second word is pay attention.

SKY: Enlist...

SHORTZ: Yes. And move E-N to the end and what do you get?

SKY: OK. Let's see. Listen.

MARTIN: Yes.

SHORTZ: Listen is right. Very good. Feature on a zebra...

SKY: Stripes.

SHORTZ: ..and - yeah - and most ready to pick, as fruit.

SKY: Let's see, ripest.

SHORTZ: Ripest is it.

MARTIN: Good.

SHORTZ: To maintain as principles and armed robbery.

SKY: OK. To maintain...

SHORTZ: Maintain as principles. You blank your principles.

SKY: Stand by?

MARTIN: It has to be six letters?

SHORTZ: Right. Or go about it from the end. What's an armed robbery? Either on the street or in a business.

SKY: A burglary, an armed robbery.

MARTIN: Hold up?

SHORTZ: Yes.

MARTIN: OK.

SKY: Hold up. OK.

SHORTZ: Now move the last two letters to the start.

SKY: Uphold.

SHORTZ: Uphold is to maintain your principles, good.

MARTIN: OK.

SHORTZ: How about accompany to a party and Spanish conquistador whose expedition caused the downfall of the Aztecs.

SKY: Well, that's Cortes.

SHORTZ: Yes.

SKY: And E-Z...

SHORTZ: And he's often what was spelled E-S at the end.

SKY: Secord.

MARTIN: When someone takes you to a party...

SKY: Escort.

SHORTZ: Escort is it.

SKY: Yeah, escort.

MARTIN: Perfect.

SHORTZ: Your last one is a double answer. Start with a novelist Laurence. Move the first two letters to the end and you get novelist Hemingway. And move the first two letters of that to end and you get a bird, for example.

SKY: So, Hemingway would be Ernest.

SHORTZ: Ernest, yes.

SKY: And then the bird...

SHORTZ: Well, if you move the last two letters to the start, you'll get novelist Laurence.

SKY: OK.

SHORTZ: Last two letters of Ernest to the start.

SKY: Oh, Ernest to the start. S-T Sterne.

SHORTZ: There you got Sterne. That's novelist Laurence. He wrote "Tristram Shandy." And if you move the first two letters of Ernest to the end you get?

SKY: The first two letters of Ernest to the end...

MARTIN: To the end of which one?

SHORTZ: To the end of Ernest.

MARTIN: Oh, to the end of Ernest, OK.

SKY: OK.

MARTIN: Is that nester?

SHORTZ: Nester, there you go - a bird, for example.

SKY: Oh, nester, all right.

SHORTZ: You guys did it.

MARTIN: Congratulations, Charlotte. That was great.

SKY: Thank you. And to you, too.

MARTIN: So, for playing the puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games, and you can read all about it at npr.org/Puzzle. And, Charlotte, before we let you go, tell us what public radio station you listen to.

SKY: KAZU.

MARTIN: KAZU in Seaside, California. Charlotte Sky of Pebble Beach, California. Thanks so much for playing the puzzle this week, Charlotte. It was fun.

SKY: Thank you very much.

MARTIN: OK. So, Will, I understand next week you're doing a little traveling, right? You're going to China?

SHORTZ: I'll be in Beijing for the Beijing International Sudoku Tournament.

MARTIN: Great.

SHORTZ: So, we'll be doing the program next week from Beijing.

MARTIN: Fabulous.

SHORTZ: Or I will, anyway.

MARTIN: I'll be here. You will be in Beijing. So tell what we have to look forward to. What's the challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes. Name a state capital, change one of the vowels to another vowel and say the result phonetically. You will name a revered profession. What is it? So again, a state capital, change one of the vowels to another vowel, say the results phonetically, you will name a revered profession. What profession is it?

MARTIN: OK. When you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Just one entry per person, please. And our deadline for entries is Thursday, May 17th at 3 P.M. Eastern Time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you are the winner, we will give you a call and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and Weekend Edition's puzzle-master, Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Rachel. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.