Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:00 am
Sat December 31, 2011

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now it is time for our final game, Lightning Fill in the Blank. Each of our players will have sixty seconds in which to answer as many fill in the blank questions as he or she can. Each correct answer now worth two points. Carl, can you give us the scores?

CARL KASELL, HOST:

We have a tie for first place, Peter. Tom Bodett and Peter Grosz each has three points and Kyrie O'Connor has two.

SAGAL: All right. First, we know that Kyrie has two points, so you're going first. The clock will start when I begin your first question. Now your questions, Kyrie, are all about diets. Fill in the blank.

KYRIE O'CONNOR: Oh goody.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Oh. Olympic athletes in Ancient Greece ate only meat in what was probably the earliest version of the blank diet.

O'CONNOR: Atkins.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: After losing 245 pounds eating only at their sandwich shops, college student Jared Fogle became a national spokesman for blank.

O'CONNOR: Subway.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: After unsuccessfully trying numerous diets, "Today Show" weatherman Al Roker finally had blank surgery.

O'CONNOR: Bariatric.

SAGAL: Yes, gastric bypass surgery.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: To show her audience how much weight she lost on the liquid protein diet, blank brought out a wheelbarrow filled with 67 pounds of fat.

O'CONNOR: Oprah.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Although it does facilitate weight loss, no one has had long-term success with the breath Arian diet in which you live on nothing but blank.

O'CONNOR: Breathing air.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: The Jenny Craig diet plan faced some controversy when it hired former White House intern blank to be its spokesperson.

O'CONNOR: Monica Lewinski.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: A shake for breakfast, a shake for lunch and a sensible dinner was the slogan for the diet drink known as blank.

O'CONNOR: Slim fast.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: In effort to help a citywide weight loss initiative, in 2008 the Oklahoma City Mayor's Office offered a free blank to any citizen trying to lose weight.

(SOUNDBITE OF GONG)

O'CONNOR: A free - I have no idea.

SAGAL: A free Taco Bell taco.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: What's better to reward dieters for their months of restraint and depravation than a tasty fat-laden taco? The program was a success, despite the fact Oklahoma City's officials didn't stop to think that free tacos are basically an undo button for diets. Next up, Oklahoma City plans to reward people who quit drinking with free tequila shots.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Carl, how did Kyrie do? Pretty well I thought.

KASELL: Yeah, a very fine round, Peter. Kyrie has seven correct answers, for fourteen more points.

SAGAL: Well done.

KASELL: She now has sixteen points and the lead.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

TOM BODETT: Formidable.

SAGAL: All right. We flipped a coin. Tom has elected to go next. Your questions, Tom, are all about junk food. Fill in the blank. In 1985, Peter Jennings interrupted a broadcast of "General Hospital" to tell viewers that the old version of the soft drink blank was coming back.

BODETT: Coke.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: In 2010, KFC introduced the double down, a new sandwich that used pieces of blank instead of bread.

BODETT: Oh, chicken.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Until it was marketed as being used on NASA flights in 1966, sales of blank breakfast drink were quite poor.

BODETT: Tang.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: A British court ruled in 2008 that Pringles potato chips should not be subject to special taxes because the snack is really only 42 percent blank.

BODETT: Potatoes.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Introduced in 2006, it didn't take long before top ten grossest candy lists included Capp Candy Company's candy blank.

BODETT: Top ten grossest candy list?

SAGAL: Yes.

BODETT: Boogers and snot.

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They're called Lick Your Wounds Candy Scabs.

BODETT: Oh, that's even worse.

SAGAL: In 2007, an Iowa man was arrested for hitting his dad with a bag of blank, causing his father to be covered in orange dust.

BODETT: Oh, Cheetos.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Nationwide shortages and rationing in 2009 forced some fans to temporarily let go of their blank.

BODETT: Let go of their Eggos.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: In 2010, an FDA recall due to contamination shocked fans of the blank candy bar.

(SOUNDBITE OF GONG)

BODETT: Contamination?

SAGAL: Yes.

BODETT: I've got to guess, the Payday.

SAGAL: No, the Toxic Waste Brand Nuclear Sludge Cherry Chew Bar.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They thought it'd be fun for kids if they named it toxic waste but they should have stopped before actually making it out of toxic waste.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The makers of the bar were forced to issue a recall due to high lead content. Oddly, their other product, the Lick the Walls Lead Poisoning Brownie is safe to eat. I don't know why.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

PETER GROSZ: Made in China, I assume, right?

SAGAL: Yes, of course. Carl, how did Tom do on our quiz?

KASELL: Tom has six correct answers, for twelve more points. He now has fifteen points, but Kyrie still has the lead with sixteen points.

SAGAL: So Peter will have to do...

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Peter will have to do particularly well to take this. Am I right?

GROSZ: How many do I need? Because I calibrate my performance to just get one shy of victory.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right.

KASELL: You need seven correct answers.

SAGAL: All right.

GROSZ: Six it is.

SAGAL: There you go.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Peter, this is for the game. Your questions are all about games and sports. In 2006, USA Today reported that because they're afraid children will get hurt chasing each other, schools are beginning to ban the game blank.

GROSZ: Tag.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: One of the earliest video games, the two-dimensional tennis game called blank was so popular it spawned sequels.

GROSZ: Pong.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: The sandwich was invented in the 1700s when the Earl of Sandwich did not want to leave his blank game.

GROSZ: Chess.

SAGAL: No, card game. Children are encouraged to throw balls as hard as they can in an attempt to hit other children in the often traumatic game blank.

GROSZ: Really? Dodge ball.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Look, it hurt. It hurt bad.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: In 2009, a scandal involving performance enhancing drugs erupted in the high stakes world of blank.

GROSZ: Poker.

SAGAL: Chess.

GROSZ: That's what I said before though, count it.

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Teen figure skating is one of the new events proposed for the 2014 winter blank.

GROSZ: Olympics.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: In October 2010, a small Wisconsin boy became the latest child who needed to be rescued after climbing inside a blank.

GROSZ: MC Escher painting.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: A claw machine game. A Connecticut man on workers comp after claiming a bad back injury was accused of fraud when he was seen blanking.

(SOUNDBITE OF GONG)

GROSZ: Doing the backstroke.

SAGAL: No, running a 40-yard dash in a dress in order to win Hannah Montana tickets.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: I should have guessed that.

SAGAL: He sure didn't look injured as he put on a dress and high heels and sprinted 40 yards while carrying an egg on a spoon. The 41-year-old man had claimed he injured his back while lifting a box of toilet paper, which is only slightly less embarrassing than being seen running in drag on the local news and much less embarrassing than being a 41-year-old male Hannah Montana fan.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Carl, did Peter pull it off? Did he do well enough to win?

KASELL: No, he didn't, Peter. Peter just had four correct answers, for eight more points. He now has eleven points. So Kyrie O'Connor, with sixteen points, is this week's champion.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Well done, Kyrie.

O'CONNOR: Thank you.

SAGAL: Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

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