Wildfires
4:36 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Fire Season Starts Slowly In The Northwest, Nationally

The wildfire season is off a slow start in the U.S. and in the Northwest. Numbers from fire mangers show total fires and the number of acres burned are well below the 10 year average.

The National Interagency Fire Center in Boise says so far this year the number of fires is down by nearly 30 percent, and the number of acres burned is down by about 60 percent compared to the 10 year average.

The National Interagency Fire Center in Boise says so far this year the number of fires is down by nearly 30 percent, and the number of acres burned is down by about 60 percent compared to that 10 year average.
The National Interagency Fire Center in Boise says so far this year the number of fires is down by nearly 30 percent, and the number of acres burned is down by about 60 percent compared to that 10 year average.
Credit Bureau of Land Management / Flickr

Things have been very quiet across the Northwest. Washington has yet to see a major fire this year, though a new 300-acre fire did start in the central part of the state this week.

The forest and range fires Idaho has seen have been small and easily contained. Oregon has seen the most activity in the region. That included the Two Bulls Fire that started near Bend June 7.

A spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service says some late snows and timely rains have kept fires from starting and spreading quickly.

Southern Oregon and southwestern Idaho are still considered to be at the highest risk for fires this season once the rains stop and temperatures begin to climb.

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