Arrange The Notes

Jan 7, 2012
Originally published on January 14, 2012 4:45 pm

On-Air Challenge: Each answer is a five-letter word or phrase containing the letters N, O, T, E plus one other letter. Answer the clues to get the words.

Last Week's Challenge: Name certain scores in a certain sport. The score and the sport are both two-word phrases with a total of 10 letters (five letters in each word). Rearrange the letters to name a different sport, also in two words (six letters in the first word, four in the second). What are the scores, and what is the sport?

Answer: Rearrange "field goals" to name "ladies golf."

Winner: David Meacham from Parkville, Mo.

Next Week's Challenge: Name four parts of a car that are also terms used in a particular game. One of the parts is spelled in three letters, two of them in five letters each, and one has six letters. Two places a car might go are also terms used in the game. What game is it, and what are the terms?

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. And it's time for the puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: Let's start with last week's challenge from the puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Name certain scores in a certain sport - and this is a two-word phrase with a total of 10 letters; five letters in each word. If you have the right phrase, you can rearrange all the letters to name a different sport, also in two words - six letters in the first word, four in the second. What are the scores and what is the sport?

MARTIN: OK. So, almost 240 of you figured out the answer. And our randomly selected winner this week is David Meacham. He's from Parkville, Missouri. Congratulations, David.

DAVID MEACHAM: Thank you.

MARTIN: So, David, tell us what's the answer to last week's challenge?

MEACHAM: Well, the answer I came up with was field goals and ladies golf.

MARTIN: OK. So, how did you come to the answer? How did you figure it out?

MEACHAM: Well, field goals came to me pretty quickly, and then I had to think about it for a while. And when I was in church actually, I just did the pyramid of words, as I learned from Will, and then I came up with ladies golf.

MARTIN: Church? David, I hope the minister didn't take it personally that you were doing the puzzle.

MEACHAM: Oh, they both know about it, so I hope they'll be listening.

MARTIN: And, David, what do you do in Parkville, Missouri?

MEACHAM: Well, I actually work in Kansas City, Missouri. Parkville is just outside. I work at a hotel downtown and I am the general cashier.

MARTIN: OK. So, just between you and me, do you ever do a puzzle on the job?

MEACHAM: Occasionally, yes.

MARTIN: Ooh, I knew it. Before we continue, though, let's welcome puzzle master Will Shortz to the program. Good morning, Will.

SHORTZ: Hi, Rachel. First of all, welcome to the show.

MARTIN: Thank you so much.

SHORTZ: And, David, congratulations.

MEACHAM: Thank you.

MARTIN: So, David, now's your big chance. Is there a question brewing that you've always wanted to ask Will?

MEACHAM: Well, I did see the movie "Wordplay" and I remember the part Will was getting the rather angry letters from people regarding the puzzle. And I was just wondering what possibly is the strangest thing you've received in the mail?

SHORTZ: Strangest thing - there's a lady on Long Island whose mother had just died, and her mother was a big doer of the New York Times crossword. The funeral was going to be in two days, and the lady asked me to send her a copy of next Sunday's New York Times magazine, which could be put in the casket with her mother.

MARTIN: Wow.

SHORTZ: So, we FedExed a copy of the next Sunday's magazine, and now her mother is happy in eternity.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MARTIN: She's - yeah, talk about being a part of someone's life. That's kind of a profound piece of mail. OK. David, so now is the time. Are you ready to play the puzzle?

MEACHAM: I'm as ready as I'm going to be.

MARTIN: All right. Will, let's go for it.

SHORTZ: All right, David and Rachel. Today's puzzle is called Arrangement of Notes. Each answer is a five-letter word of phrase containing the letters N-O-T and E, plus one other letter, and you answer the clues to get the words. For example, if I said N-O-T-E plus A to make a word meaning to make amends, you would say atone.

MEACHAM: Got it.

MARTIN: OK.

SHORTZ: OK. And the added letter can go in any position in the answer. Here's your first one: note N-O-T-E plus B, as in boy. And your clue is a kind of steak S-T-E-A-K.

MEACHAM: T-Bone.

SHORTZ: T-Bone. That was a fast one.

MARTIN: Oh fun.

SHORTZ: Number two is note plus C, and it's the French word for story.

MEACHAM: French word for story.

MARTIN: French. I'm trying to channel my high school French.

MEACHAM: I took Spanish in school but never French.

SHORTZ: Oh, it's probably a related word. I don't know Spanish for story. Do you know this one, Rachel?

MARTIN: You know, I was thinking I did, but it doesn't include the letters N-O-T-E-C, so I guess I don't.

SHORTZ: OK. Well, the answer is conte C-O-N-T-E. That's the French word for a story or a tale. All right.

MARTIN: OK. Now we know, now we know.

MEACHAM: I'll always remember that.

SHORTZ: Now you know. This show is so educational. Your next one is note plus D, and your clue is in good physical shape.

MEACHAM: Toned.

SHORTZ: Toned. That's fast. Note plus G, to make mount, and it's a two-word phrase.

MEACHAM: Get on.

SHORTZ: That's fast.

MARTIN: Ooh nice.

SHORTZ: Plus I, to mean attach to, and, again, it's a two-word phrase.

MEACHAM: Tie on.

SHORTZ: Tie on is it. Plus L, to mean add a slow tempo in music.

MEACHAM: Lento.

SHORTZ: Um-hum. Plus M, as in Mary, to make a French impressionist.

MEACHAM: Monet.

SHORTZ: Um-hum. Plus P, as in Peter, to make bridge. You want the Italian word for bridge.

MEACHAM: Is it ponte?

SHORTZ: That's it. Plus R, to get contents of a certain cartridge.

MARTIN: Contents of a certain cartridge.

MEACHAM: Toner.

SHORTZ: Toner is it. Plus S to make beginning.

MEACHAM: Plus S - onset.

SHORTZ: That's fast. And you're last one, plus T - and this is a fill in the blank clue - Grand blank National Park

MEACHAM: Teton.

MARTIN: Yay.

SHORTZ: That was so good, David.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MARTIN: David...

MEACHAM: I brought my new French.

MARTIN: Oh, I know. You and me, both.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MARTIN: But you made it easy for me. I could kind of sit back and have a cup of coffee while you took that one.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MEACHAM: That was a lot of fun.

MARTIN: Great job. So for playing our puzzle today, David, you will get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. And you can read all about it at NPR.org/puzzle.

And, David, for the record. Which Public Radio station do you listen to?

MEACHAM: KCUR in Kansas City, Missouri.

MARTIN: Great. David Meacham, thank you so much for playing the puzzle this week. We appreciate it.

MEACHAM: Thank you. It was a lot of fun.

MARTIN: OK. So, Will, next week. What's the challenge we're looking at?

SHORTZ: A challenge. Well, name four parts of a car that are also terms used in a particular game. One of the parts is spelled in three letters, two of them in five letters each, and one has six letters. Also, two places a car might go are also terms used in this same game. What game is it and what are the terms?

MARTIN: OK. So when you have the answer, go to our Web site, NPR.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link - just one entry per person, please. And our deadline for entries is Thursday, January 12th at 3 P.M. Eastern Time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner we'll give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle-master, Will Shortz.

Will, thanks so much.

SHORTZ: Thanks a lot, Rachel. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.