Sueann Ramella

Social Media Manager

Growing up in the Tacoma-Puyallup area, Sueann Ramella remembers being a precocious young reporter for her school paper. A big fan of shows like 60 Minutes and 20-20, she dreamed of one day being a hard-hitting journalist, uncovering scandals and exposing the hidden truth. She attended Washington State University, studying journalism. It was there that she discovered her love of radio. Sueann began working for Northwest Public Radio in 1997 after her sophomore year, and has been with us ever since.

In 2000 she became the host of All Things Considered, and then in 2008 switched to hosting Morning Edition. Even after a few years, she still has trouble getting up so early. After she shuts off her alarm in the morning, she lies there trying to think of something to tempt herself enough to get up. It’s usually coffee or cereal. On the really tough days she thinks of cookies.

Sueann has more hobbies than she has time to indulge. She enjoys creating things, whether sewing, knitting, baking or drawing, and recently she has been trying her hand at hobby farming, dabbling in the challenge of self-sufficiency on a few acres behind her home. She raises chickens and grows more than a dozen different vegetables, all in Burberry-plaid boots of which she is inexplicably proud. Who says you can’t farm in style?

Ways to Connect

Katie Burk / NPR

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! will say goodbye to Carl Kasell on May 17th. He will no longer be the show's official scorekeeper, but will continue to record voice mail greetings for show winners. And those lucky winners will experience the giddy feeling of hearing Carl Kasell say their name.

BRUCE PAVITT

Next month is the 20th anniversary of Kurt Cobain’s death. Two decades have passed since the lead singer of Nirvana committed suicide, yet there’s continuing interest in his life. Recently, a press photographer released photos of the dingy L.A. apartment Cobain shared with Courtney Love.

7:37 a.m. on Tuesday. Credit Twitter Photo/WSDOT

Two people were killed in the crash of a news helicopter near the Seattle Space Needle Tuesday morning.  They were identified as longtime KOMO-TV news photographer Bill Strothman, 62, of Bothell, and pilot Gary Pfitzner, 59, of Issaquah.  

To some observers, many people take jobs in Yakima with a two-year plan in mind. That was the case for Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital's CEO, Rick Linneweh, and also for the hospital’s senior vice president and chief operating officer, Russ Myers. But Rick decided to forgo the two-year plan, and in this excerpt from StoryCorps Northwest, he tells Russ why he ended up staying at his job for 38 years.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

StoryCorps

Imagine getting to know your Dad behind security glass. For eight-year-old Erica Rodarte watching her father move in and out of prison for gang related crimes was normal. On StoryCorps Northwest hear Erica share how it feels stepping outside a gang-influenced lifestyle.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

StoryCorps

When John Baule accepted the job of Yakima Valley Museum Director, he thought he’d give it a couple of years. But his two-year plan became a ten-year passion. On StoryCorps Northwest, John tells his friend, Ralph Thompson, about the museum embracing minority stories of the Yakima Valley.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

Sueann Ramella / NWPR

Off Crooked Mile Road in Granite Falls, Washington stands a giant wooden Torii. This Japanese arch marks the entrance to the only Shinto shrine on mainland U.S. soil: the Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America. It’s serene here cedar trees rising up along the banks of the Pilchuck River.

Courtney Flatt

The Teanaway River winds around the eastern slope of Washington’s Cascade Mountains. For years, conservation groups tried to protect the area – with no success. Now, a coalition has purchased the land in one of the largest acquisitions in Washington’s history.

Polo Aguilera lived for his community. He participated in 10 Yakima council boards, funded local sports teams and was the founder of Yakima's first Mexican bakery, La Petunia. He was known as a man who loved to help others. When Polo’s health started to fail, it didn't come as a surprise that the community came to his family's aid. Polo's wife, Terry Aguilera  talked to her co-worker and friend, Cherokee Frazier about Polo's struggle with cancer and the help their family received after his death.

StoryCorps

Senior citizen Howard Kelly Prentice Jr. decided he needed a little activity. So he signed up for an Elderhostel vacation. He ended up with quite a souvenir, his future wife, Dotty Prentice, proving it's never too late to fall in love.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

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