Sueann Ramella

Social Media Manager

Growing up in the Tacoma-Puyallup area, Sueann Ramella remembers being a precocious young reporter for her school paper. A big fan of shows like 60 Minutes and 20-20, she dreamed of one day being a hard-hitting journalist, uncovering scandals and exposing the hidden truth. She attended Washington State University, studying journalism. It was there that she discovered her love of radio. Sueann began working for Northwest Public Radio in 1997 after her sophomore year, and has been with us ever since.

In 2000 she became the host of All Things Considered, and then in 2008 switched to hosting Morning Edition. Even after a few years, she still has trouble getting up so early. After she shuts off her alarm in the morning, she lies there trying to think of something to tempt herself enough to get up. It’s usually coffee or cereal. On the really tough days she thinks of cookies.

Sueann has more hobbies than she has time to indulge. She enjoys creating things, whether sewing, knitting, baking or drawing, and recently she has been trying her hand at hobby farming, dabbling in the challenge of self-sufficiency on a few acres behind her home. She raises chickens and grows more than a dozen different vegetables, all in Burberry-plaid boots of which she is inexplicably proud. Who says you can’t farm in style?

Ways to Connect

Polo Aguilera lived for his community. He participated in 10 Yakima council boards, funded local sports teams and was the founder of Yakima's first Mexican bakery, La Petunia. He was known as a man who loved to help others. When Polo’s health started to fail, it didn't come as a surprise that the community came to his family's aid. Polo's wife, Terry Aguilera  talked to her co-worker and friend, Cherokee Frazier about Polo's struggle with cancer and the help their family received after his death.

StoryCorps

Senior citizen Howard Kelly Prentice Jr. decided he needed a little activity. So he signed up for an Elderhostel vacation. He ended up with quite a souvenir, his future wife, Dotty Prentice, proving it's never too late to fall in love.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

Storycorp

Imagine leaving your children with relatives while you look for jobs in another country. This is the case for many migrant workers who come to Washington state to harvest crops. In StoryCorps Northwest, hear Trinidad Rivera shares the painful memory of being left behind in Mexico for 3 years while her parents worked in the US with her daughter, Keila.

UPDATE 11:15 AM:  All stations have now returned to air. Thank you for your patience.

Due to strong winds overnight in the Moses Lake area, a satellite dish allowing stations to receive audio became nonaligned and several of our stations are off-air. These stations include 91.5 FM Moses Lake/Ephrata, 90.3 FM Wenatchee, 89.9 FM Ellensburg, and 91.3 FM Leavenworth. An engineer is working to correct the problem as quickly as possible.

Storycorp

Inspired by the life and activism of a friend, Jan Michelle Lowell and Mike Isaacs of Yakima decided to work together on a community project. They raised funds to replicate the town's only public statue, the 110-year old Spanish-American War memorial of Colonel J.J. Weisenberger, a much loved military leader and a signer of the Washington State Constitution. Jan and Mike want to move the statue from its current location on Yakima Avenue, to the Yakima Valley Museum for preservation.

StoryCorps

These days it’s not uncommon for people with no children to marry single parents. But it doesn’t always mean an instant family. Today on StoryCorps Northwest, you’ll hear from Patrick and Mikki Boughton of Yakima, talking about the forging a family and the struggle they experienced through some daunting obstacles.

StoryCorps

When you think of farming in America, you may think of golden fields, red barns and abundant orchards.        You may imagine a  farmer in overalls, sitting on a tractor. But what about a farmer sitting in class -- at a university? Cragg Gilbert and his cousin Charlie de la Chapelle discuss how education and research are today's tools in farming.

Copyright 2013 StoryCorps and  Northwest Public Radio 

Courtesy of Lawrence Pintak

Al Jazeera America is live and available to 48 million homes in the US. But how many viewers will tune in? Lawrence Pintak, founding dean of The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University and Northwest Public Radio commentator, says viewers who are tired of celebrity news may give Al Jazeera America a try.

StoryCorps

KDNA, the country's first Spanish-lanuage community radio station, was founded by Ricardo Garcia of Yakima. Garcia worked with Cesar Chavez, and established the Yakima Valley Farm Worker’s Clinic.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

Bruce Bradberry

Back in the 1960's, tourists to Tijuana would sit on a zonkey and have their picture taken. It was a good living for the owners of the zonkies (donkeys striped with lady's hair dye) but times have changed.

Latah County Historical Society

You’re probably aware of TV evangelists. They speak to you through the television, some claiming to heal you through the screen. Before television, there were radio evangelists, and mail-order evangelists. One of which offered a money-back guaranteed religion, and was headquartered in the Northwest. Sueann Ramella has the story of the Mail-Order prophet of Moscow, Idaho.  

WSU Athletics

By Joe Utter and Adam Lewis

Washington State University Coach Mike Leach banned players from using Twitter on Tuesday evening after a series of messages on the social media website was brought to his attention.

“Twitter is now banned around here so don’t expect anything on Twitter,” Leach said after Tuesday’s practice. “Twitter’s banned and quite frankly if after today you see anything on Twitter from our team-- and I don’t care if it says ‘I love life’-- I would like to see it because I will suspend them.”

Photo Credit: WSU Murrow Symposium Web Page

CBS correspondent Dan Rather was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Award Thursday. Morning Edition Sueann Ramella had the chance to sit with him.

The University of Idaho is reevaluating its options in football, with the emphasis on staying in Division 1 and protecting its Football Bowl Subdivision status. The statement from University of Idaho Athletic Director Rob Spear came following announcements from colleges last week that make the future of the Western Athletic Conference unclear.

Photo by Nigel Chadwick / Wikimedia Commons

Did you know London has a tempo of 122.86 beats per minute? So says musician David Byrne, of Talking Heads and solo career fame. Byrne’s new sound installation , titled “Get It Away,” builds a song around sampled sounds recorded in the city.

“It turned out that most of the sounds seemed to converge around a common rhythm,” Byrne says, “I let the sounds dictate the groove, the tempo, and then I simply played along.”

SALEM, Ore. – All around the Northwest, people are lining up at convenience stores and gas stations with dreams of a big-time payday. The multi-state MegaMillions lottery jackpot has topped a half-billion dollars. In Salem, Brenda McDonald bought three tickets at a downtown grocery store. She's already thought about what she'd do if she won.

Photo courtesy StoryCorps Northwest

Late in his life, Leonard Cornell developed Alzheimer’s.  As his condition deteriorated, he told one story again and again to his daughter Deborah. Here, for StoryCorps Northwest, she shares that story. It's of an unlikely friendship and how it shaped her father's life.

 

 

EPA Gives Oregon Water Report A Mixed Review

Mar 19, 2012

SALEM, Ore. -- Oregon’s 2010 water quality report has earned a mixed review from the U.S. EPA.

Millions died under Cambodia's communist regime. Sinoun Hem, of Tacoma, was a young girl when the Khmer Rouge came to power. She tells her friend Fauluaina Pritchard her about how she was taken from her family and forced into a child work camp.

KENT, Wash. -- “A trooper’s trooper” -– that was a phrase used repeatedly to describe Washington State Patrol Trooper Tony Radulescu at a memorial Wednesday afternoon in Kent.

He was born in Bucharest and immigrated to the United States at age 14. He served in the U.S. Army, spoke five languages and was well known for having a great sense of humor and a radiant smile.

Northwest Public Radio

Dion Cole's father loved speed. He shared his love of fast cars and the rev of engines with his two sons, and his adopted daughter, Dion. She shares some of the memories of fast times with her father. She also shares how he took his own life.
 

Photo credit: Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho - Newt Gingrich was in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, Thursday night to fund raise and rally voters before the state’s Super Tuesday caucus.

Newt Gingrich: “Barack Obama is, in national security terms, the most dangerous president in our lifetime.”

Gingrich called it “disgraceful” that President Obama apologized to Afghan authorities for Qurans accidentally burned on a U.S. military base.

Correspondent Jessica Robinson talked to voters at the north Idaho event … and found that for many, the race for the Republican presidential nomination is between two candidates.

Imagine an idyllic childhood. You play in the woods and climb trees, or splash in the creek and catch frogs. You're surrounded by a dozen homes that look  just like yours, and inside each one are kids to play with, or adults who give you ice cream. But about 400 yards away is a uranium mill. For StoryCorps Northwest, Doug Sly tells his friend Terry Kinzel about growing up near a yellow cake mill in Ford, Washington.

Photo source: StoryCorps

Romantic relationships can be difficult to maintain, especially if they're long distance relationships. Avery Green and Tim Toerber of Tacoma share how they met, and how they manage to keep their relationship going during Tim's many deployments to Afghanistan. 
 

Photo by: justmaketheshift.idaho.gov / Northwest News Network

Idaho Governor Butch Otter has created a nuclear energy commission to look at the future role of the Idaho National Laboratory.

La Dona Madison worked at the "Big Pasco" military base in Washington during World War II. It was a busy place with soldiers eveywhere but not just American soldiers. She tells her son, Michael Madison, about some unusual guests at the base.

SEATTLE -- A Marine sergeant from Seattle was killed this week in Afghanistan. An improvised explosive device killed 23-year-old Will Stacey in Afghanistan's Helmand province.

StoryCorps Northwest

Life in Seward, Alaska wasn't easy for English major Amy Buckler and her husband. They had a tough time making ends meet. One day, they decided to leave and start a new life in Oregon with their young daughter. In today's StoryCorps Amy tells her now 10-year-old daughter, Mina Black, about a trip that would prove tougher than they'd ever expected.

Jason McArthur / Wikimedia Commons

GRANT'S PASS, Ore. – Oregon Congressmen Peter DeFazio and Greg Walden appeared together in Grants Pass Thursday. They were pushing their proposal to open up some public forests to logging. Amelia Templeton reports they were tight lipped about the details.

Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The Washington state insurance commissioner has fined an Indiana company $100,000 for charging Washington college students the wrong rates.

Unicare Life and Health Insurance sold over 8,000 insurance policies, primarily to international students, between 2004 and 2009. Most were short-term policies costing an average of $80 a month. The problem is, the company used unapproved methods to determine those rates. Unicare also excluded people from coverage whom they shouldn’t have. Rich Roesler is a spokesperson for the state’s insurance office.

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