Steve Reeder

Classical Music Host

A native of Seattle and a University of Washington graduate, Steve Reeder began his life in radio at KUOW-FM, while still in his teens. He has since worked on two separate occasions at KING-FM there, first as Program Director and later as a staff announcer, producer, and interviewer.  In between, Steve spent nine valuable and highly enjoyable years at WFMT-FM in Chicago, where he had the good fortune to work alongside the likes of the late Studs Terkel, and where he (quite by coincidence) had the opportunity to play the very first CD on American radio.  In case you're wondering, it was a Tuesday evening, and it was the opening section of Richard Strauss' "Also sprach Zarathustra."

Steve taught courses in broadcast speech/journalism at Roosevelt and Northwestern universities, and he took several of Roger Ebert's film appreciation courses at the University of Chicago. Perhaps not surprisingly, he spends a lot of his free time in movie theatres, when not traveling, golfing, or indulging his keen interest in historical maps and prints.

Ways To Connect

Ramsey Fendall / Risk Love LLC

When actor-director Ethan Hawke (star of Boyhood) found himself seated next to a classical pianist named Seymour Bernstein at a dinner party, stage fright was what they found they had in common. Bernstein had handled his decades ago, by walking away from the glitter and fame of a concert career in favor of a teaching career and a solitary life. Hawke, in his directorial debut, profiles his new friend in a labor of love, the tender documentary film Seymour: An Introduction.

Wikimedia / http://en.wikipedia.org/

When it comes to motion pictures associated with Halloween--films that can really scare us--they can succeed in many ways. Sometimes a picture can literally shock us with its imagery; in other cases, it may disturb us (in an entertaining way, of course) on a deeper, purely psychological level. Here's a short list of Steve Reeder's personal favorites in the horror/supernatural vein. As an avid moviegoer, all of these continue to "haunt" him.

Psycho (USA, 1960)

Rain Rannu / Flickr

With another Halloween approaching, horror, thriller, and supernatural films
come to the fore.  Many of these pictures feature original music by composers
who have the gift for pushing our buttons and sending our pulses racing.

Bernard Herrmann, a frequent collaborator with director Alfred Hitchcock,
helped make history with his searing, astringent score for Psycho (1960).
Violins have never quite seemed the same.  Nor has taking a shower.