Scott Graf

Scott comes to BSPR from WFAE in Charlotte, N.C., where he served as local host of NPR’s “Morning Edition” for the past eight years. He began his new position as Morning Edition Host/Senior Editor for BSPR in 2012.

Scott is a multi-award winning host and reporter who was named the North Carolina Journalist of the Year in 2007. He has produced several feature stories for NPR news magazines and he contributes to WBUR's “Only a Game” sports program.

State of Idaho

A new center for treating people having a mental health crisis is now open in Idaho. Officials held a ribbon-cutting in Idaho Falls Monday.

The center is the first of its kind in Idaho. It’s meant to address the need for care for people during mental health emergencies. Mental health advocates and police say too often, those people end up in jail or hospital emergency rooms. The new center is modeled after one in Billings, Montana.

A.J. Balukoff / http://www.ajforidaho.com/

Balukoff began the hour-and-a-half back-and-forth by introducing himself as a successful businessman and longtime Boise school trustee. Otter touted his administration’s fiscal responsibility, and Bujak attempted to paint himself as an alternative candidate who would change the way Idaho government works.

By the end of the forum, the three had touched on Idaho’s economy, school funding, the state of its roads and bridges, a prison scandal, and more.

Philippa Willitts / Flickr

Couples gathered at courthouses around the state early Wednesday. They were acting on a decision from the San Francisco-based appeals court the night before that essentially green-lighted the issuance of marriage licenses to gay couples.

In Boise, the Ada County courthouse opened at 8 o’clock. Enthusiastic couples streamed inside. But by the time they’d reached the Clerk of Court’s office, things had changed. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy stepped in and issued a stay on the circuit court’s ruling. Gay couples were turned away.

The National Guard / Flickr

A slow wildfire season in the U.S. means the Forest Service won’t have to dip into other parts of its budget to cover firefighting expenses. The federal government’s fiscal year ended Tuesday. As Scott Graf reports, it’s the first time in three years the agency’s firefighting allotment will cover actual costs. 

In the battle against wildfires, the Forest Service often draws on a fleet of air tankers — planes that drop fire retardant from the sky.

But the fleet shrank dramatically in the early 2000s, and by 2012, the Forest Service was woefully low on planes. Now, the agency is quickly increasing the number of planes at its disposal — and modernizing the fleet in the process by adding bigger, faster and more efficient planes.

Some of the Idaho homeowners evacuated because of a nearby wildfire are now being allowed to return home.  Authorities are still warning homeowners they may be evacuated again. 

Gun stores around the country have had difficulty keeping up with demand for ammunition in recent months. Fears of government tightening of gun and ammunition controls have meant that retailers, from Wal-Mart to mom-and-pop gun shops, haven't been able to keep bullets on the shelves.

Cliff Poser's gun shop, Cliff's Guns, Safes and Reloading in Boise, Idaho, is one of them. Business has been so crazy lately that he has to keep a special stash of ammunition, just so customers who buy guns from him can also buy bullets.