Ruby de Luna

Reporter, KUOW

Ruby de Luna is a features reporter at KUOW. She had originally planned to go into TV, but ditched the idea after discovering public radio. Ruby reports on a wide range of issues, but her focus has been on Seattle's immigrant community. It's a natural draw because Ruby is a transplant from Taipei, Taiwan. Before KUOW, Ruby worked in the Washington State Legislature as a broadcast information assistant for the House Democrats.

Ruby holds a BA in communication from Seattle Pacific University. She was a Jefferson fellow at the East–West Center Media Program in Honolulu, Hawaii. She's a mentor for the student radio project at AAJA (Asian American Journalists Association). She is former Western Washington Pro Chapter president of the Society of Professional Journalists.

In the age of computer/digital audio editing, Ruby is proud to be one of the few old–schoolers who can still edit tape with a razor blade.

Ways To Connect

Bailey-Boushay House turns 20 this year. The residential care facility in Seattle’s Madison Valley was the first of its kind in the country. It focused on the health care needs of people with AIDS. It was born out of a crisis. Over the years the patients’ medical needs have changed. The facility has evolved, too. Ruby de Luna traces the history of Bailey-Boushay.

The two men vying to be Washington’s next governor squared off Tuesday.

Jay Inslee and Rob McKenna fielded questions about jobs and the economy. But the opening question was about healthcare.

Seattle city leaders are praising a hero who prevented more victims in Wednesday’s shooting.

Asst. Police Chief Jim Pugel described what he saw from a video that captured the shooting at Café Racer. He says the hero was sitting next to the suspect when he started firing at people.

Pugel: "The hero picked up a stool and threw it at the suspect, hit him. Picked up another stool, and hit him, this time, suspect is pointing at him.  During that time two or possibly three people made their escape and the suspect was between them and the door."

Photo courtesy HHS.gov

Washington State’s health insurance exchange got a boost. Wednesday the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the state more than $127 million in federal grants. That money will help develop and implement the state’s Health Benefits exchange. The exchange is a marketplace where consumers will be able to compare and shop for health insurance plans.

Secretary of health Kathleen Sebelius says so far 34 states are in different stages of creating their own exchange…

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control has sent two epidemiologists to Washington State. The investigators will try to find out what’s causing the state’s rapid rise of whooping cough cases. We get more from Ruby de Luna.

Gov. Chris Gregoire is reaching into emergency funds to help contain the state's whooping cough epidemic.

Photo credit: Sarah Gilbert/ Flickr / KUOW

The state has been trying to crack down on ER visits for conditions that are not critical. But health care providers say the state’s policies go too far, they’re unsafe for patients, and will shift costs to hospitals.

Hospitals and emergency room doctors want to address the problem their own way. They’ve put together what they call best practices for reducing unnecessary ER visits. A key component of that is using an electronic health information system.

Photo credit: Chad A. Bascom / U.S. NAVY

Secretary of Health Mary Selecky announced today that as of last month, there have been 640 cases of whooping cough. That’s compared to 94 in the same period last year.

Selecky: “If this pace continues, we’re on track to have the highest number of whooping cough cases in our state in decades.”

OLYMPIA - Washington will appeal a recent federal ruling on the state’s pharmacy regulations. Last month a federal district court judge found the state’s rules on dispensing medications unconstitutional. At the heart of the case is emergency birth control pills. Ruby de Luna reports.

RENTON -- A proposal to reduce concussions in high school football is creating a lively debate among some of the state’s high school coaches. Monday, that proposal will be a big focus at a meeting of the Washington Interscholastic Athletics Association in Renton. Ruby de Luna has details on the plan, known as Amendment 6.

Pages