Rowan Moore Gerety

Reporter
Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

  Ask any special education teacher about the job, and eventually you’ll hear about paperwork: reports and forms for every aspect of instruction. It’s a workload that cuts into time teachers have to plan or teach students directly. All that paperwork is one reason the bulk of teaching in special ed is now done by paraeducators, often with no more training than a high school diploma.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

Special education is about inclusion: making sure kids who need it get extra help, so they have the same opportunities as their peers. But an emphasis on rules and protocol sometimes means schools lose sight of real outcomes for students.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

Drive through this vast landscape of sagebrush and pine forests with Lorah Super, and she’ll point out the scars of wildfire all around you: scorched hillsides and razed homes from this summer’s Okanogan Complex fires, and gradual re-growth from burns in 2012 and 2014. “Last year, everything to the South, North, and East was on fire--this was a little bit of a donut hole in the Carlton Complex,” Super says, pointing out the window.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest News Network

Yakima voters made history Monday by electing two Latino candidates to a city council that has long wrestled with the implications of the city’s rapidly growing Latino population.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest News Network

Voters in Yakima will elect their first Latino city councilor today, after a lawsuit brought by the ACLU forced the city to create a new electoral map. Even before the results come in, some residents of the new majority-Latino districts feel that change is already underway.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

  “Hello!” Squeals Drea Lake as she enters her husband Tyrone’s room. They have been married for more than 50 years; Tyrone has had Alzheimer’s since 2002. He recently moved into a nursing home in Seattle, where Drea visits him 5 days a week.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

This wildfire season has hit northwest tribal lands particularly hard. Firefighters’ first priority is “life and property.” But some tribal members wonder why protecting some kinds of property—like farms and even second homes— comes before tribal forest land.

Photos courtesy families of the firefighters.

Family, friends, and fellow firefighters gathered Sunday at a memorial for the three young men who were killed battling a blaze in North Central Washington.

InciWeb

Light rains and higher humidity helped firefighters slow the spread of wildfires burning in North Central Washington on Sunday. More favorable weather is expected this week.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

Thousands of farm workers living in wildfire country are particularly vulnerable in times of emergency. One problem is that warnings in Spanish don’t reach everyone that needs to hear them.

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