Patricia Murphy

Patricia Murphy is an award-winning reporter at KUOW Public Radio in Seattle focusing on military affairs, veterans' issues and criminal justice. She began her career at WBUR Boston in 1994 and has worked at KUOW since 2000.

Patricia's most recent series, “Less than Honorable,” investigated how the military handles more than 3,000 sexual assault cases each year. Her 2011 collaboration with the Seattle Times, “The Weight of War,” looked at heavy loads carried by troops and the increase in chronic orthopedic injuries as a result; the series won a national award for Excellence in Health Care Journalism from the Association of Healthcare Journalists. She also received a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a documentary on IV drug use and has had her work recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In 2012, Patricia was inducted into the Dart Society, a network of journalists who cover trauma, conflict and social injustice. In a briefing document accidentally sent to her by an Army public affairs officer, Patricia was described as “a professional, no-nonsense reporter who comes to the table fully prepared,” though her colleagues at KUOW might also describe her as the station cut-up.

Patricia holds a B.A. from Emerson College in Boston.

AP Photo/Darren Abate

The hearing officer overseeing the Army’s desertion case against Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has submitted his recommendation.

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is facing charges of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy.

Bergdahl Family

U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl faces a hearing Thursday to determine whether he’ll be court-martialed on a desertion charge.


The suicide rate among recent veterans is about 50 percent higher than non veterans with similar demographics. But a study published Wednesday found that deploying to a war zone didn't necessarily increase a service members' suicide risk.

The U.S. Department of Defense study examined data from nearly 4 million service members who served between 2001 and 2007. It found that of the 5,041 suicides by 2009, the service members who deployed were no more likely to kill themselves than those who had not deployed.

U.S. Pacific Fleet / Flickr

The USS Michigan will be the first submarine to allow enlisted women to serve onboard. It’s part of the Navy's plan to have women doing 20 percent of the jobs on mixed gender submarines by 2020. The Michigan is an Ohio-class nuclear-powered guided missile submarine stationed at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor.

The Navy began allowing female officers on subs three years ago. Lieutenant Commander Brian Bandura says allowing enlisted woman is the next step in the Navy’s plan to a fully integrated submarine force.

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This story is part of a three-part series about veteran benefits (Part 1 / Part 2).

Joint Base Lewis-McChord

Military officials held a town hall style meeting at Joint Base Lewis McChord Wednesday to talk about Ebola virus.

The base will eventually house a thousand troops who are in west Africa, to help the fight against the outbreak.

Lieutenant Colonel Rodd Marcum is chief of preventable Medicine at Madigan Army Medical Center. He says the meeting was a way of dispelling any myths about the risk on base of contracting Ebloa from service members returning from overseas.

KCTS Photo / Aileen Imperial

KUOW's Patricia Murphy brings us the story of Oso Chapel Pastor Gary Ray.

Pastor Ray helped provide spiritual and emotional support for a community that prided itself on its strong sense of independence.

Copyright 2014 KUOW

PEOSoldier / Flickr (

In the past two years, four law enforcement departments in Washington state have been suspended from the military surplus program known as 1033.That’s the government program that issues surplus military gear to state and local municipalities who show a need, but some of those weapons have gone missing.

Under the program law enforcement agencies can apply to receive everything from shop Vac’s to Mine Resistant Vehicles. They only need to pay for the cost of shipping.

Seattle Police say it was a Seattle Pacific University Student who disarmed a gunman on campus Thursday.

Police have arrested the man they believe killed one person and wounded three others. At this point police believe the gunman acted alone and was not a student at the university. KUOW's Patricia Murphy reports.

The State Department of Corrections has shut down a decades old program staffed by inmates to remove asbestos from prison facilities.The Department of Corrections said the closure was unrelated to a $70,000 fine from the Department of Labor and Industries.