Paige Browning

Correspondent, Spokane Public Radio

A native of Spokane, and graduate of Lewis and Clark High School, Paige first worked in radio as a DJ at her college radio station, KBGA-Missoula, where she quickly jumped into reporting and anchoring news. While her interest in radio as a public service runs deep, she also brings experience in producing and directing documentary films and TV magazine shows. Paige and her classmates completed four shows for Montana PBS as students at the University of Montana, two of which were nominees for a Northwest Academy of Arts and Sciences student Emmy award. After graduating, Paige traveled as a Collegiate Development Consultant for a women’s leadership fraternity, visiting over 20 universities throughout North America. To maintain her interest in journalism while traveling, she wrote for two blogs and recorded video and audio for her organization. Now, she has more energy than ever for reporting news, and her goal is to bring the best quality, highest priority, relevant, and entertaining news to SPR. When Paige is not on air, she’s probably skiing, volunteering, or discovering new bands and artists.

FLICKR PHOTO/GOVINSLEE (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The head of Washington's largest psychiatric hospital was fired Tuesday.

frankieleon / Flickr

Healthcare providers in Seattle and across the country are getting more tools to help fight a drug epidemic.

The federal government has announced $2.8 million in grants to clinics in Washington. It's part of a broader plan to fight opioid abuse.

Susan Johnson is the U.S. Health and Human Services Director for the Northwest. She said there's a reason we're hearing about an epidemic.

"In Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington, we lose an average of 153 people a month," Johnson said. "This was in 2014, from drug overdoses. Far more than deaths caused by car crashes."

Jay Baker / Flickr

Advocates for gun safety launched a new initiative campaign in Washington today .

The Alliance for Gun Responsibility is pushing a measure that would give families a new tool in preventing gun violence.

Nick Kenrick, / Creative Commons

Two storm fronts over the weekend caused flooding and broke a few rainfall records in the Northwest.

Two people were killed and three more wounded in a shooting near a Seattle homeless camp last night.

Elaine Thompson / AP Images

FBI agents in Seattle met with reporters Friday to discuss the agency's role in fighting violent extremism.

Dozens of Western Washington University students gathered on campus today to pray against fear and hate.

That's after university President Bruce Shepard canceled today's classes because of what he calls hate-speech on social media.

He says someone within 10 miles of the Bellingham campus posted threats over the weekend against a variety of ethnic groups, on the anonymous site Yik-Yak.

Shepard normally doesn't like to cancel classes.

But he says felt compelled to after reading the posts.

Ted S. Warren / A

The Washington firefighter severely burned in an August wildfire headed home Wednesday. Daniel Lyon, 25, said he can’t believe he’s here today. Three fellow firefighters died in the same flare-up that injured him. 

Lyon has spent the last three months at Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center, healing from burns on 60 percent of his body. He now wears a clear plastic facemask meant to heal scarring and spoke with reporters before leaving the hospital. 

Paige Browning / Spokane Public Radio

President Obama’s emergency declaration for Washington unlocks federal firefighting tools. U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell applauded the declaration during a stop in Spokane Friday, but says the state still needs aerial resources.

Fairfax County / Flickr

The purple pipe could be a local solution for Washington drought problems. The state Department of Ecology is hoping to offset water shortages by encouraging municipalities to use reclaimed water, often fed through purple pipe.

Kate Ter Haar / Flickr

Washington’s governor made a trip to rail-lines in Eastern Washington Thursday to sign legislation that funds transportation projects. Outside Cheney, Governor Jay Inslee also drove a small train on tracks that will benefit from the new bill.

Paige Browning / Spokane Public Radio

Spokane police have reacted quickly to a new report that shows racial disproportion in the rate of arrests. The city’s police and committee on multicultural affairs have formed a work-group to address why people of color are arrested at higher rates.

Washington State University

Two Spokane lawmakers submitted bill’s Wednesday to change a nearly century-old state law regarding medical schools.

Republican Senator Michael Baumgartner and Democratic Representative Marcus Riccelli introduced the bills to help Washington State University create its own medical school. The bills would amend a 1917 state law that allows only University of Washington to operate a medical school, and caps the amount of students at 120.

Riccelli’s measure has 60 co-sponsors from the House, which makes a super-majority.

Associated Press

The rollout of police body cameras in Washington has been slow, even for Spokane which purchased more than 200 of the devices. Before full implementation, police leaders will ask the legislature for changes.

The US Department of Justice has found leadership was lacking amongst Spokane police for more than eight years. This came in a list of 42 recommendations handed down by the federal COPS program to the Spokane Police Department Friday.

The recommendations came after the police department requested a federal review of its use of force practices. It stems from a 2006 case, in which Spokane man Otto Zehm was beaten by police and died.

COPS Director Ron Davis says they reviewed more than 200 use-of-force cases from the past five years.

Paige Browning

This week both Washington State University and University of Washington revealed their next moves in developing a Spokane medical school.

UW has asked Gonzaga University to consider a medical education partnership, now that UW and WSU dissolved their Spokane program. GU President Thayne McCulloh says a partnership is not set in stone.

“Gonzaga wants to be an active part of the and we are looking forward to opportunities to talk more broadly about what role Spokane sees Gonzaga playing,” McCulloh says.

Washington’s Supreme Court heard oral arguments at Gonzaga University’s law school Thursday. Students and community members grabbed seats to watch three hearings, one of which originated in Spokane.

Justice Mary Fairhurst attended Gonzaga as an undergrad and law student, and says they try to take the court on the road three times a year. She says the case of State of Washington versus Jason Allen Graham, a Spokane man, was a good fit to bring on the road.

Christopher Sessums / Flickr

Wednesday night, the Spokane Public Schools board authorized a second charter school for the district: Spokane International Academy. The board approved its first charter school Pride Prep in January.

Orin Blomberg / Flickr

Washington State University leaders announced plans Wednesday for a medical school in Spokane. School leaders approved the idea last week, which has the University of Washington on edge about its own Spokane program.

Photo credit: ELBAZ / Wikimedia commons

By Friday morning, Washington State University leaders could approve one of the biggest educational ventures the school has seen in decades. A new report shows WSU is ready for a full-fledged medical school in Spokane.

About 450 people turned out for the public hearing in Spokane last night on a proposed coal shipping facility in southwest Washington. It was the second of five statewide hearings hosted by the state Department of Ecology, Army Corps of Engineers, and Cowlitz County.

A judge in Spokane has set a steep bail for the first of two 16-year-old males charged with 1st degree robbery and 1st degree murder. Both males are accused of robbing and beating to death 88-year old Delbert Belton, a World War II veteran.

Paige Browning

Regulating government surveillance in Spokane took the spotlight in Monday’s city council meeting. But the newest, flashiest police equipment is being ignored under city regulations.

The reaction is split in Coeur d’Alene after the city council passed an ordinance banning gay and lesbian discrimination Tuesday night.

Paige Browning reports.


Today/Friday through Monday is the 12th year of the Sasquatch Music Festival at the Gorge Amphitheater, where more than 20-thousand people will camp and see live music. Paige Browning reports.

Matthew Ryan Buquet

Wednesday FBI officials in Spokane arrested a man for connection with mailing a poisonous letter to a government building. Spokane Public Radio’s Paige Browning reports.

Law enforcement officials say they have increased the level of security for this year’s Bloomsday race in Spokane. More than 50,000 people participate in the 12-K run. Paige Browning reports.

Washington voters find it hard to determine if political campaign ads are accurate, according to a survey by the AARP of Washington. Paige Browning reports, the organization hosted an event in Spokane Thursday to share the results and educate their members.

The Spokane City Council Monday night voted unanimously to approve a $1.67 million settlement between Otto Zehm’s family and the city. Paige Browning reports.

Photo credit: David Johnson / Wikimedia Commons

Agriculture officials say fire season looks mild this year for Washington and Idaho, but that doesn’t mean they’re taking a backseat on preparedness.

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