Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Today in Argentina, Alberto Nisman was buried. He'd been investigating the country's worst terror attack, a bombing at a Jewish community center that remains unsolved 20 years later, and he accused Argentina's president of a cover-up. He was found dead earlier this month with a bullet to the head. The way Argentines view Nisman's murky death could greatly affect the country's politics. NPR's Lourdes...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: Argentina buries a prosecutor today. His mysterious death came just after he made accusations against Argentina's government. He was found with a bullet to his head. He said the president was involved in covering up the bombing of a Jewish center in 1994. And as we're about to hear, the story reaches back even farther than that. We begin on the streets of Buenos Aires with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro...

In more normal times, the annual Holocaust remembrance ceremony would have drawn the Jewish community to a somber ceremony at Argentina's Foreign Ministry. But a large part of the community decided to boycott the event Tuesday and hold its own on the site of a deadly bombing two decades ago. The speakers, including the treasurer of the Delegation of Argentine Israeli Associations, Mario Comisarenco, wanted to make clear why. "In honor of the victims, we will not sit at the table with people...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: A dead investigator, a disgruntled spy, a humble locksmith, an embattled president and, of course, a connection to the Middle East. Sounds like the plot of a new thriller, but it's actually a real-life murder mystery that is gripping Argentina. Today, Argentina's president said she believed a prosecutor investigating the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center there was murdered. NPR South America...

It was a terrible Christmas season for stores in Brazil. For the first time in more than a decade — since 2003 — sales went down. Roberta Pimenta owns a small shop selling children's clothes at the Butanta mall in Sao Paulo, which is aimed squarely at the middle-class shoppers who live in the area. "It was the worst drop in sales since I've had this store," Pimenta says. "In seven years it was the worst year I had. And every year you have a 10 percent increase of employees' salary, 10 percent...

With January first marking the start of many people's self-improvement projects, Lourdes Garcia Navarro shares a story she reported earlier this year about plastic surgery in Brazil. This story first aired on All Things Considered on Oct. 7, 2014. Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: You may beat taking this slogan to heart today - a new year, a new you. It could mean today, for example, on January 1, you're starting a diet or...

Kelly Brenner ushers in guests at the Adentro Dinner Club. This is a "​puertas cerradas"​ restaurant — meaning behind closed doors. It's a culinary movement where people cook for paying guests in their homes. Adentro is the most well-reviewed in Buenos Aires​. ​Brenner, who is originally from Boulder, Colo., acts as the host, and her Argentine fiance, Gabriel Aguallo, does the cooking, focusing on grilled meat. ​On a recent evening, visitors gasped with pleasure at the beautifully set dinner...

Brazil's national truth commission on Wednesday delivered a damning report looking at the abuses committed during that country's military dictatorship, which lasted from 1964 to 1985. The 2,000-page document details for the first time a history of arbitrary detention, torture, executions and disappearances. Until now, Brazil has sought to bury its difficult past. President Dilma Rousseff, who was herself tortured during Brazil's dictatorship period, broke down when she addressed the nation...

Leonel Kaplan, an Argentine jazz musician, often has to travel abroad. Before a recent trip to Europe, he went to a bank in Buenos Aires to change money and then went to get a haircut. Kaplan felt happy and relaxed and took the bus home after what had been an uneventful trip. That, however, was about to change. "As I get down from the bus, a motorcycle with two people wearing helmets cuts me off," he recalls. "One gets off and takes out a gun and says to me directly, 'Give me the 500 euros...

For an American, it probably would be a really hard Jeopardy question, but in Argentina, pretty much anyone you stop can answer this: Who is the judge in New York at the center of Argentina's default crisis? Pablo de Luca, a systems engineer walking along a downtown Buenos Aires street recently responded easily: Judge Thomas P. Griesa . "Griesa is an enemy for us," he says. Georgina Segui, an office secretary stopped while she was doing errands, also knew the answer. "We are constantly...

To gauge international interest in Uruguay's legal cannabis market, spend just a few minutes at a small marijuana shop called Urugrow in Uruguay's capital, Montevideo. In a period of about 10 minutes, owner Juan Manuel Varela gets a call from Brazil. A man from Canada shows up to see what the market would be for his company, which sells child-safe packaging for marijuana products. Shortly after, two American travelers stop by looking to score weed. Another lurking pot-preneur, Argentinian...

Culinary superstars gathered in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo this month at an event organized by the Basque Culinary Center. But they weren't there to cook. Instead, the the famous chefs were talking about biodiversity.

You may heard their names before: Ferran Adria of Spain, Alex Atala of Brazil, Michele Bras of France and Enrique Olvera of Mexico. They are so called super-chefs who've lorded over the kitchens of some of the priciest, most innovative restaurants in the world...

On June 11 — one day before the World Cup started — two policemen picked up three black teenagers in Rio de Janeiro. The three hadn't committed any crime — but they did have a history of petty offenses. The officers drove them up to the wooded hills above the city. One was shot in the head and killed. One was shot in the leg and the back and left for dead. Another escaped. We know what happened that day because the police officers left their patrol car cameras on, and the videos surfaced on...

Brazil is teeming with law schools and lawyers. But the wheels of justice in the country turn slowly — most cases take years to resolve and sometimes even decades. To understand why, we visited the musty offices of Judge Laurence Mattos in Sao Paulo. Mattos' suit is gray; his smile is thin. He seems as if his job has flattened him somehow. He's not very verbose either, and when he does speak, it's in a monotone. For 22 years, Mattos explains succinctly, he's been a judge dealing with...

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Janet and Jaqueline Timal are 40-something-year-old sisters, and they have what they call a plastic surgery fund. "I'm always saving money. When I see I've gathered up enough money for another surgery I do it," Jaqueline says. She has had breast implants put in and also a tummy tuck. She's visiting the plastic surgeon's office again to do a famed Brazilian butt lift, which is the same as a breast lift, but on your backside. Janet has had a tummy tuck; she's now doing her breasts, too. Between...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: Brazil is in the midst of a presidential election. It's one of the most hotly contested votes there in a generation, and there's still a ways to go before it's said and done. Over 140 million Brazilians went to the polls yesterday, and as expected, the incumbent, Dilma Rousseff, won but not by enough to avoid a runoff later in the month. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro has our story from Sao Paulo....

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro. Rachel Martin is away. Brazilians go to the polls today at the end of a dramatic campaign season. One candidate died in a plane crash. Presidential incumbent Dilma Rousseff is a former political prisoner and cancer survivor. Pitted against her is Marina Silva, a popular environmentalist who grew up in the Amazon. Also running is the grandson of a...

Brazilians head to the polls Sunday in one of the most exciting elections in recent history there. The presidential race pits two women against each other — a first for the South American country. Candidate Marina Silva, if elected, would make history by being the first Afro-Brazilian president. But first she must beat incumbent Dilma Rousseff, a former Marxist guerrilla who was tortured under the dictatorship in Brazil. It's been an election season filled with shocks. The presidential...

It's election season in Brazil, and a group of young women hold up placards outside the Cuiaba airport in support of their candidate. The capital of the central Brazilian state of Mato Grosso is best known for its cattle ranching and agriculture. It is the Texas of Brazil — big, flat and hot with people who moved here from all over the country as kind of frontiersmen. For the past two decades, one man has politically loomed above them all. His name is Jose Riva. He's been a politician in the...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: In Brazil, a new presidential candidate is up and in the race. Her name is Marina Silva and polls show her possibly beating the incumbent. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro has this profile - the 56-year-old black woman whose uncommon past is making her an attractive alternative for Brazil's future. LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, BYLINE: Marina Silva grew up in the Amazonian state of Acre - the daughter of rubber...

It's been over a month since the World Cup ended in Brazil, but the shame of the country's blowout loss remains. Once, Brazilians were welcomed in other countries with talk of Brazil's soccer dominance; now, everyone merely speaks of their historic defeat against Germany. Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Finally this hour, drama from the world of soccer. It's been over a month since the World Cup ended in Brazil, and Brazilians are...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: A Brazilian presidential candidate was killed today. His plane went down as he was traveling to a campaign event. 49-year-old Eduardo Campos was running third in the polls. The election is October fifth. Brazil's president, Dilma Rousseff, has declared three days of official mourning. The candidate's death has made a hotly contested election even more uncertain. That story from NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro in Sao...

The story of Lenira de Oliveira and her dead lover's letter is a tale of Brazil. It's a story of love, jealousy, forgiveness, life after death and the criminal court system. And it's true — though it sounds like fiction. It sounds, in particular, like the work of the late Gabriel Garcia-Marquez. The novelist once said that the inspiration for his books came from daily life in his region. "Surrealism runs through the streets," he said . "Surrealism comes from the reality of Latin America."...

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Everaldo Dias Pereira — known to his flock as Pastor Everaldo — shakes the hands of potential voters at a shopping mall in a suburb of Sao Paulo in Brazil. As he wishes them the peace of the Lord, a group of supporters shout out: "Enough of corruption, enough of people who don't know the word of God. We want Pastor Everaldo." The pastor is running for president, and even though it is unlikely he will win — polls show he only has 3 percent of the vote — his socially conservative message...

Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: And now on to Sao Paulo, where NPR South America correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro caught the game at a bar. And, Lourdes, I assume there is collective anguish, albeit very loud anguish right now. What's the mood? LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, BYLINE: Well, I think people are drowning their sorrows in this bar. And I think anguish is absolutely the right word. I think you could also use the word despair, shock, horror. People have told me this surpassed even the...

Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Brazil faces Germany today in the semi-finals of the World Cup. RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: Deep into the tournament, Brazilian fans have developed a game day routine. INSKEEP: So we present to you now, with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro in Sao Paulo, Brazil's World Cup ritual in four acts. MONTAGNE: Act one - getting to the game. GARCIA-NAVARRO: I am in a car right now doing what pretty much every single other Brazilian is doing, which is trying to get to where they...

Brazilian street artist Paulo Ito has captured the spirit of the World Cup with two controversial images: One depicts a starving Brazilian boy with nothing but a soccer ball to eat; the other depicts even protesters watching the games on television. They both speak to viewers worldwide about the costs of staging the mega event. Ito explains what inspired his work and what's happening in Brazil. Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Before...

Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: And now some World Cup news that is not about the U.S. team. Argentina played Switzerland today. The South American country won, scoring a goal in overtime. Argentina's fans were out in force in Sao Paulo, where the two teams faced off. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro says supporters of Brazil's greatest rival are getting a lot of attention in the host country. LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, BYLINE: They planted their blue and white flag on Rio de Janeiro's famed...

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