Liz Jones

Liz Jones is a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration and diversity issues. Her work has taken her to central Mexico, where she produced an award-winning documentary about immigration and indigenous communities.

Previously, Liz worked as an editor and writer for Oxygen Media in New York.

One of Liz’s greatest challenges is staying put. She’s lived in Spain and Peru and loves to travel. But she finds a good radio story can often satisfy the travel bug – you get to meet new people, make sense out of something unfamiliar and find creative ways to communicate.

Her work has been heard on NPR and other national programs, including The World, Latino USA and Weekend America.

In her spare time she enjoys spending time with family, making jam, snowboarding and watching every filmed version of "Pride and Prejudice" over and over and over again.

Ted S. Warren / / Associated Press

The debate about Syrian refugees continues to gain force. And more Northwest politicians are taking sides.

Liz Jones / KUOW

Washington State will continue to welcome Syrian refugees.

Liz Jones / KUOW

American Airlines flight number 1239 touched down at Sea-Tac Airport, and a family of Syrian refugees walked down the jet way and into a new life.

They’re one of the first families to arrive in the Seattle area since the U.S. agreed to take in more Syrian refugees. The civil war in Syria has displaced more than 4 million people.

SounderBruce / / FLICKR Creative Commons

Neighborhoods where non-English speaking Latinos live, tend to have the most toxic air quality.

That’s according to new research out of Washington State University.

Flickr user Jetsandzeppelis

Pesticides are often sprayed on Northwest crops like apples, grapes and cherries. And those toxic chemicals can pose major health risks to people who work in the fields. The Environmental Protection Agency announced new rules Monday to protect farm workers from pesticides.

AP Images

The Red Cross in Washington is currently operating nine shelters in response to the state's wildfires.

Nepalese communities across the U.S. are mourning the loss in their home country from last weekend's earthquake. Officials in Nepal now estimate the number of people killed in the disaster stands at more than 4,000.

In the Seattle area, prayer bells ring out at a Hindu temple. Hundreds of heads bow. A boy in a turquoise sweater peeks through his folded hands. A husband and wife comfort each other, their eyes red from crying.

User "Atomic Taco" / Flickr

Last summer, a record number of migrant children arrived alone on the southern U.S. border. This crisis has a ripple effect in Washington. It’s one of the dozen or so states with a foster care program for some of these border kids. But homes for them are in short supply.

Tracie Hall / Flickr

A federal judge in Seattle Friday heard arguments in a potentially far-reaching immigration case. At issue was whether children who face deportation alone are entitled to an attorney, at the government’s expense. 

There’s a rising trend of children coming alone to the U.S., unlawfully crossing the southern border.

Most are from Mexico and Central America. They’re officially called ‘unaccompanied minors’.

Light Brigading / Flickr

Friday morning in Seattle, a federal hearing will resume that could have a bearing on immigration cases across the country. The central question is whether children who face deportation have the right to a government-provided attorney.

Earlier this week, a 12-year old girl with a bright red bow in her hair, sat before an immigration judge in Seattle. She quietly told the judge her age. But her twin brother was more shy. The judge explained the government is seeking to deport them. Then, he scheduled their hearing for a later date, to give them time to find a lawyer.