Liz Jones

Liz Jones is a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration and diversity issues. Her work has taken her to central Mexico, where she produced an award-winning documentary about immigration and indigenous communities.

Previously, Liz worked as an editor and writer for Oxygen Media in New York.

One of Liz’s greatest challenges is staying put. She’s lived in Spain and Peru and loves to travel. But she finds a good radio story can often satisfy the travel bug – you get to meet new people, make sense out of something unfamiliar and find creative ways to communicate.

Her work has been heard on NPR and other national programs, including The World, Latino USA and Weekend America.

In her spare time she enjoys spending time with family, making jam, snowboarding and watching every filmed version of "Pride and Prejudice" over and over and over again.

Oso Landslide Survivors
7:15 am
Fri September 26, 2014

We're Staying In Oso, But Every Day We Say Goodbye

Ron and Gail Thompson outside their new home in the Oso area.
Credit Aileen Imperial / KCTS

Ron Thompson was known as the mayor of Steelhead Drive. He and his wife Gail Thompson lost their home and many neighbors in the Oso landslide. But they’ve decided to stay in Oso, and start over in a new home just four miles from the old one. They find hope in rebuilding their community while striving to find meaning in the disaster.

Read the Thompsons' story on Medium. 

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Texting and Driving
8:13 am
Wed April 9, 2014

U-Drive, U-Text, U-Pay: Washington Patrols Crack Down On Texting And Driving

Each fine for distracted driving, including texting and driving, is $124.
Credit VCU CNS/Flickr

You’ve probably heard the slogan “Click It or Ticket” to promote seat belt safety.

Now, Washington state is joining in a new national campaign to target people who text and drive.

Special patrols will be out statewide, starting tomorrow and this campaign comes with its own snappy slogan as well. 

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NW Detention Center
4:21 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Detainees At Northwest Detention Center Moved To Isolation

Several inmates at an immigration detention center in Tacoma have been moved to isolation. Immigration officials confirm the separation started late last week. It comes on the heels of a recent hunger strike at the facility.

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Tribal News
5:38 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Nooksack Vote Shows Divide on Disenrollment Struggle

This past weekend’s election on the Nooksack reservation near Bellingham leaves an uncertain future for hundreds of its members.

The tribe is seeking to remove about 15 percent of its people.

As Liz Jones reports, this tribal disenrollment would be the largest in the state’s history.

Tribal members describe record turnout Saturday, as Nooksack voters weighed in on candidates for its governing council. More than 700 of the tribe’s 2,000 people voted.

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Bond Hearing Ruling
4:56 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Federal Ruling: Immigrants at NW Detention Center Entitled to Bond Hearings

As a hunger strike continues at an immigration detention center in Tacoma, a new federal court ruling coincidentally meets one of the protesters demands. 

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Hunger Strike Day 5
6:16 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Hunger Strike Continues at NW Detention Center

The Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington is currently experiencing a five-day long hunger strike with more than 100 people refusing to eat.
Credit Seattle Globalist

More than a hundred detainees at an immigration lockup in Tacoma are entering their fifth day without food. The hunger strike began Friday, with about 750 people refusing to eat. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has stepped up medical observations of the protesters.

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Northwest Snowpack
4:43 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Washington Snowpack Rebuilding Toward Normal

Credit mikelehen / Flickr

On a clear day in Seattle, Nick Bond can size up the mountain snowpack on his bike ride to work. But as Washington state’s climatologist, he crunches the data for a more precise picture.

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Asia
1:52 am
Mon August 19, 2013

U.S. Family Of Ill Prisoner Wants North Korea To Release Him

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Salt
11:52 am
Wed August 7, 2013

After Immigration Bust, Herb Grower Tries A New Path

Ted Andrews, CEO of HerbCo International, says the H-2A agricultural guest worker program needs improvements.
Liz Jones for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 7:58 pm

The ongoing immigration debate in Congress often spotlights the job market for people living in the U.S. illegally. Not long ago, that market included one of the country's top organic herb farms — until an immigration bust forced the business, based in Washington state, to clean up its payroll.

Ted Andrews, owner of HerbCo International, says he's learned some tough lessons during the transition to a legal workforce. Lesson No. 1: "There are events that can destroy a business in the snap of a finger," he says. "This was one of them."

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