Kristian Foden-Vencil

Reporter, Oregon Public Broadcasting

Kristian Foden-Vencil is a veteran journalist/producer working for Oregon Public Broadcasting. He started as a cub reporter for newspapers in London, England in 1988. Then in 1991 he moved to Oregon and started freelancing. His work has appeared in publications as varied as The Oregonian, the BBC, the Salem Statesman Journal, Willamette Week, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, NPR and the Voice of America. Kristian has won awards from the Associated Press, Society of Professional Journalists and the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors. He was embedded with the Oregon National Guard in Iraq in 2004 and now specializes in business, law, health and politics. 

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People are walking more, especially in the West, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2005, 56 percent of adults reported walking for at least 10 minutes a week. Five years later, that percentage was up to 62 percent.

The state unveiled its new plan to coordinate and improve care for people with Alzheimer's Monday.

In a far reaching opinion Thursday, the Oregon Supreme Court gave judges the power to decide what evidence can and cannot be released to the public after a trial.

Several news organizations, including Oregon Public Broadcasting, sought a set of 1,200 files with the names of  Boy Scout staff who'd been accused of sexual abuse.

The files had been used as evidence during trial. But after that trial, Multnomah County Judge John Whitmire said the files could only be released if they were redacted.  Media organizations appealed, asking to see what the jury had seen.

Non-farm payroll employment added a healthy 6,900 jobs in May, the most the state has added in one month since January of last year.

Oregon's gross domestic product grew by 4.7 percent last year, that's the second biggest increase seen in all states.

Gross domestic product is defined as the value added by production, so the wages of employees; the profits of businesses; and the taxes paid to governments.

In Oregon, the GDP of the construction sector, the education sector and health all grew by about 4 percent.
But Josh Lehner of the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis says it's the 15 percent increase in the high tech manufacturing sector that pushed the state to the top of the growth chart.

Photo Courtesy of Alaska Airlines

The Federal Aviation Administration restricts flights to and from the D.C. area. But it has now authorization for eight non-stop flights from Western cities to Reagan National. Senator Ron Wyden says it'll be good for business.

The Oregon Secretary of State's office has issued its largest ever penalty for a violation of signature gathering laws.

Photo credit: © BP p.l.c. / BP

Oregon has filed a securities lawsuit against the petrochemical giant, BP.  The state wants to recover investment losses triggered by the Gulf of Mexico oil spill two years ago.

The lawsuit alleges that investors, like the state, were misled about the safety of deep water drilling. Lawyers say BP made 'materially false' and 'misleading' statements. James Sinks of the Oregon State Treasury says state lawyers did their due diligence before filing, and are confident.

Photo credit: Wikimedia user M.O. Stevens / Wikimedia Commons

Oregon's unemployment rate edged down to 8.6 percent in March, essentially unchanged from 8.7 percent the month before. At 8.6 percent, Oregon's unemployment rate is higher than the national average. It stands at 8.2 percent.

But Employment Department Spokesman, Tom Fuller, says Oregon's economy appears to be improving, and fewer and fewer people are claiming unemployment insurance.

Photo credit: Oregon Office of the Governor

Monica Enand runs the Oregon start-up 'Zapproved,' which makes legal software.  She thinks the 'Oregon Investment Act' will be a shot in the arm for new small businesses.

Monica Enand: "In the very beginning, especially in Oregon, it's tough to get any kind of investment dollars to get things rolling and get off the ground."