Kirsten Peters

Washington State University

    

Here's the golden tale of, well... gold. WSU’s Rock Doc, Dr. E. Kirsten Peters, brings us up to date on a glittering rock discovered in California.

Washington State University

How do you catch and prosecute someone illegally trafficking nuclear materials? You could catch them uranium-handed… except that granite also contains traces of uranium. That’s the challenge of nuclear forensics: telling what’s evidence of nuclear material, and what’s just background noise. WSU’s Nathalie Wall is a chemist who handles nuclear forensics. The Rock Doc, Kirsten Peters, brings us her story.  

Washington State University

A team of scientists at Washington State University is working to develop new sources for chemicals that might aid in the development of biofuel startups.  One avenue of research: poplars.  Dr. Kirsten Peters, the “Rock Doc,” takes a look.

Washington State University

While I have been dinking around for months, trying to lose five pounds, two of my friends have gotten serious about weight loss. Each of them is down 50 pounds.

I’m pleased for them, of course, and truly impressed by their accomplishments. Successfully combating overweight and obesity is one of the best things people can do for their health. It can help everything from joint pain to heart function, from Type 2 diabetes to certain aspects of mental health.

Northwest Public Radio

Nothing could be better—or healthier—than a walk through the countryside, right?  Wrong.  New research reveals that walking briskly could be better.  "Rock Doc"  Kirsten Peters explains.

My Labrador-mix from the pound, Buster Brown by name, loves to walk with me. On the weekends we often do a six-mile walk around town or along the Snake River where Buster can be off leash (as Mother Nature intends).

nwpr.org

If you live in the U.S. there’s a 47% chance that you have a dog.  That number goes up to 56% if you live in Canada. When your dog goes on a walk with you, snuggles up next to you on the couch or tilts her head at something you say the bond between you deepens.  Here comes the heartbreaking aspect of having a dog.  They just don’t live long enough.  Dr. Kirsten  Peters, the “Rock Doc” offers some insight into why.

Talking with Fido

Jul 11, 2013

A Border Collie named Chaser understands far more words than the usual “sit,” “stay” and “down” that most of us teach our dogs. Trained by retired psychology Professor, Dr. John Pilley, Chaser has demonstrated comprehension of over 1,000 words.  Whether your dog is a latent genius or not remains to be seen, but the subject of language acquisition in canines has sparked the curiosity of a number of people including Dr. Kirsten Peters, the Roc Doc.

Washington State University

The “fiscal cliff” and sequestration are words you’ve heard a lot in recent months.  In light of the United States’ growing deficit and budget crisis, Dr. Kirsten Peters looks at how a purposeful national energy plan could save the US a lot of money.

To a geologist like me, it was most notable by its absence in the political campaigns that lurched to their conclusions in November. I’m talking about an energy plan with real teeth, one that addresses everything from national security to the cost of energy to greenhouse warming of the planet.

Border Collies are consistently named the most intelligent of all dogs. Is their intelligence simply a matter of nature, or is there some nurture involved as well? Dr. Kirsten Peters wonders about the answer.

Photo courtesy Washington State University

Republished from WSUNews

 

PULLMAN, Wash. - I swim laps at noon several times a week. I enjoy the water, and the gentle exercise is good for my aging joints.

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