John Ryan

John Ryan / KUOW

Homelessness is on the rise in Seattle. In the city’s University District, a new homeless camp has popped up on a busy sidewalk. Members of the camp say 20 people are living in the small cluster of tents.

It’s too small to call a tent city, so I’ll call it a tent-village. It’s on the sidewalk in front of the U District post office. Tent-village resident Stephen Crow is a leader of a group calling itself The Ave Foundation. He says he’s been homeless since he was 12. He’s now 36.

John Ryan / KUOW

No one will face criminal charges in connection with a refinery explosion that killed seven Tesoro workers in Anacortes. The Justice Department is closing its four-year-long criminal investigation. KUOW’s John Ryan reports.

John Ryan / KUOW

It was Washington state’s worst industrial accident in nearly 50 years.

“Skagit 911. What’s your emergency?” “I’m trying to find out what's going on at the refinery.” “You know, we don’t know at this point, sir.” “Well, all I can tell you is I live two and a half miles from it, and the explosion was hard enough to rock my house, and there’s one hell of a fire going there.”

That explosion in 2010 at the Tesoro refinery in Anacortes killed seven workers.

Four years later, no one has been held publicly accountable for the seven deaths. As John Ryan reported, state efforts to penalize Tesoro have stalled. To improve worker safety, the federal government is wielding a tool it rarely uses: criminal prosecution of one of the nation’s largest corporations.

Here’s John Ryan with part two of our investigation.

Ted S. Warren / Associated Press

It's been four years since a deadly explosion at an oil refinery shook the town of Anacortes, Washington. The question of who's responsible for seven workers' deaths still hasn't been answered fully. Refinery owner Tesoro agreed to pay millions to families of the dead, but the company is fighting accusations that it willfully put its workers in harm’s way. With multiple legal proceedings continuing to swirl around the accident, it remains unclear whether anyone will be held accountable for the human cost of Tesoro gasoline. John Ryan brings us part one of this KUOW investigation.

A tunnel machine is set to resume digging beneath the streets of Seattle in June. This machine isn't named Bertha.

John Ryan

Fundraising for this November's elections is kicking into high gear. That means candidates are cozying up to people with money. Sometimes, elected officials even get friendly with the companies they regulate.

For the second day in a row, Washington Governor Jay Inslee has asked the federal government to boost its disaster assistance to victims of the Oso landslide.

Washington Department of Natural Resources

State officials say they didn't approve clearcutting inside a no-logging zone directly above Saturday's deadly landslide in the town of Oso.  But aerial photos show a clearcut extending into the zone where a loss of trees would heighten the risk of landslides. 

A new federal report says overcrowding and understaffing puts the health of Snohomish County Jail inmates at risk. The report comes after eight deaths at the jail in the past three years.

A bad fall in the hospital can turn a short visit into a long stay.

Such falls featured in congressional discussions about patient safety, and in a new study in the Journal of Patient Safety about medical errors. Falls are one part of a multistate clash between nurses and hospitals over how to improve the safety of hospitalized patients.

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